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Topic:
How to mount TV to brick fireplace?
This thread has 46 replies. Displaying posts 31 through 45.
Post 31 made on Sunday June 28, 2015 at 09:37
thecapnredfish
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Perhaps this will get your attention. Alligator anchors are like a tight virgin -----. Fit tight and the will not come out, unless you want them to. Why mess with epoxy, tapcons that may strip because you used a slightly bent or worn bit. Or the material is too hard for proper threading. Alligator anchors become fused to the surface and the fastener. Tapcons have their place in standard cement or block. Brink and mortar, neither in my opinion work well with threaded fasteners. Again we all have our opinion.
Post 32 made on Sunday June 28, 2015 at 14:46
Audiophiliac
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With the proper adhesive, I would totally glue a mount to the brick. But only if it was going to be absolutely permanent. Best to use a mount with post leveling adjustment......just in case. They have adhesives that will hold a car to a billboard. Sticking a tv to a fireplace would be easy peasy. Such adhesives are likely not cost efficient and would require some hefty safety precautions. Not worth the effort or cost when appropriate fasteners are readily available.
"When I eat, it is the food that is scared." - Ron Swanson
Post 33 made on Sunday October 18, 2020 at 07:56
Hi-FiGuy
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Its been a few years now so what say you all.
Would like to install a 75 on a drop down.
Fireplace is gas insert so not brick and cinder block.
It is true brick not a veneer.
Said I would never do it but here we are.
I am thinking some form of anchor plus adhesive compound on mount to the brick.

Has any one had bricks peel off the walls due to poor craftsmanship of the masonry work?

Lets talk actual failures over time.
Do they speak English on What?
Post 34 made on Sunday October 18, 2020 at 08:20
Brad Humphrey
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The only failures over time I have seen, is when someone who didn't know or understand drilling into the mortar instead of the brick.

On the outside (exposed to the elements), this will cause problems within a few years (depending on your climate and if you see below freezing temps where you are).

On the inside, it takes a bit longer to be realized.
Post 35 made on Sunday October 18, 2020 at 09:41
highfigh
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On October 18, 2020 at 07:56, Hi-FiGuy said...
Its been a few years now so what say you all.
Would like to install a 75 on a drop down.
Fireplace is gas insert so not brick and cinder block.
It is true brick not a veneer.
Said I would never do it but here we are.
I am thinking some form of anchor plus adhesive compound on mount to the brick.

Has any one had bricks peel off the walls due to poor craftsmanship of the masonry work?

Lets talk actual failures over time.

Bricks aren't stacked, free-standing- they're attached by using metal strips at intervals, determined by the mason. Because of that, when an insert is used, they have some kind of panel behind and that can be used to drive lags into, or use toggle bolts. If you drill a small hole in a mortar joint with a long masonry bit, you'll likely hit plywood unless they buttered the bricks and stuck them to a cementitious backing, like the kind used for tile. Even then, toggles will work but you also need to look at the forces acting on the bolts- when the mount is collapsed and the TV is close to the wall, they're undergoing shear and if the mount is extended, the TV and mount are trying to pull the top bolts out while the bottom is in compression (acting like a hinge). However, using metal shields and lag bolts is unlikely to push the bricks apart and fracture the joint unless the top row is very close to the top of the bricks. If this is the case, I would use some kind of toggle or bolt it into the backer if that will hold the bolts well enough.

Which mount are you considering?
My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."
Post 36 made on Sunday October 18, 2020 at 10:05
tomciara
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It could come down to your level of comfort.

Fixed mount to brick? Why not, if the brick has no integrity issues.

Movable mount to brick? A 75 TV? Why?

Personally, I would have no interest.
There is no truth anymore. Only assertions. The internet world has no interest in truth, only vindication for preconceived assumptions.
Post 37 made on Sunday October 18, 2020 at 16:28
Audiophiliac
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I recently mounted a 65" Sony on a Mantel Mount to a real brick fireplace built in the 80s. I used 4 redhead expansion bolts in the brick. I was only a little concerned. It has been there over a year and I have been back several times. It has even been through a minor earthquake. Still solid as a brick $4!+house. Pun intended.

I have mounted TVs to literally every surface you can imagine. Using dozens of different methods. All I know is that they are all still hanging. More than 1 way to skin a cat. No right or wrong as long as nothing comes crashing down.
"When I eat, it is the food that is scared." - Ron Swanson
Post 38 made on Sunday October 18, 2020 at 22:46
Hi-FiGuy
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On October 18, 2020 at 09:41, highfigh said...
Bricks aren't stacked, free-standing- they're attached by using metal strips at intervals, determined by the mason. Because of that, when an insert is used, they have some kind of panel behind and that can be used to drive lags into, or use toggle bolts. If you drill a small hole in a mortar joint with a long masonry bit, you'll likely hit plywood unless they buttered the bricks and stuck them to a cementitious backing, like the kind used for tile. Even then, toggles will work but you also need to look at the forces acting on the bolts- when the mount is collapsed and the TV is close to the wall, they're undergoing shear and if the mount is extended, the TV and mount are trying to pull the top bolts out while the bottom is in compression (acting like a hinge). However, using metal shields and lag bolts is unlikely to push the bricks apart and fracture the joint unless the top row is very close to the top of the bricks. If this is the case, I would use some kind of toggle or bolt it into the backer if that will hold the bolts well enough.

Which mount are you considering?

Thank you for the detailed answer, it is appreciated. Understanding the construction methods has been my concern.

I prefer the toggler method, I prefer to have something behind the structure. This is my first home with a gas insert fire place.

As far as what mount, I have just begun looking into them and certainly am open to suggestions from you all.

The reason 75 is because its what I have already.
Do they speak English on What?
Post 39 made on Sunday October 18, 2020 at 23:12
buzz
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Will the TV drop down in front of the fire?
Post 40 made on Monday October 19, 2020 at 10:22
highfigh
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On October 18, 2020 at 22:46, Hi-FiGuy said...
Thank you for the detailed answer, it is appreciated. Understanding the construction methods has been my concern.

I prefer the toggler method, I prefer to have something behind the structure. This is my first home with a gas insert fire place.

As far as what mount, I have just begun looking into them and certainly am open to suggestions from you all.

The reason 75 is because its what I have already.

Gas fireplace inserts are obviously framed in a completely different way from a regular fireplace- it's usually done with wooden studs, plywood and surrounded by air with ducting to carry out the heat. If possible, find plans for the place and look for the detail sheets for the fireplace, cabinets, etc- you would be able to see how the bricks were attached and if there's any kind of gap between the bricks and plywood.

Does this wall have a wooden mantle? If so, look at the rear edge of the top and check for screws (you won't usually find them if it has been painted). If you find them, maybe you could remove it and look at the method for installing the cleat. If it has brackets, you could inspect that, too- even if the bricks were cut to fit around the brackets, you would see some indication of how they were attached to the wall. Worst case, you hunt for studs in the wall, behind the bricks and best case, someone has detailed drawings or photos of the framing.
My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."
Post 41 made on Monday October 19, 2020 at 11:04
tomciara
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On October 18, 2020 at 16:28, Audiophiliac said...
No right or wrong as long as nothing comes crashing down.

And the odds are small it will come down.

Frankly, with all the methods cited here, there is almost no likelihood of the mount pulling loose from the brick... as long as the brick is built right, bricks made solid, mortar done right... and you will never know until...
There is no truth anymore. Only assertions. The internet world has no interest in truth, only vindication for preconceived assumptions.
Post 42 made on Tuesday October 20, 2020 at 19:31
Trunk-Slammer -Supreme
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On October 18, 2020 at 22:46, Hi-FiGuy said...
This is my first home with a gas insert fire place.

As far as what mount, I have just begun looking into them and certainly am open to suggestions from you all.

When dealing with a fabricated fireplace, I would remove one brick at a minimum, or a few so I could install a back box, then drill a hole in the substrate and use a camera to see what's behind.

Measure to find studs and then use long screws to go into the substrate. Nothing will let go ever.
Post 43 made on Thursday October 22, 2020 at 00:25
cshepard
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I tend to over-do anything that isnt stupid straightforward. Having said that, just within the past month, Ive mounted two 85 TVs on brick fireplaces.

The first one was an 85 Sammy QLED. Construction was cultured stone over brick. I used six 3/8 x 5 Tapcons. Theyre the biggest Tapcons Ive seen in the home improvement warehouses. Im 100% confident in the installation.

The second one was an 85 Sony XBR, heavier than the Samsung. Construction was just brick on this one. I used eight 5/16 x 2 1/2 Redhead sleeve anchors. Im 100% confident in this installation as well. Just my 2.
Chris
Post 44 made on Thursday October 22, 2020 at 10:18
Hasbeen
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I've done hundreds of them over the years...

Use RedHead Sleeve anchors, readily available at Home Depot.   You could hang 10 tvs off those things, it's not going anywhere.  I can't remember the size bolt I used to get, but the nut on the sleeve is 1/2".

If you want to conceal the wire, take a masonry bit approximately the same size as the mortar spacing and drill a series of holes around an individual brick that will be behind the TV.  Behind that brick is a regular wall, pop a hole through the drywall and fish your wire accordingly.  (In this scenario, cut the hole in the brick closest to the top of the tv)

IF you don't have an attic, then you're going to have to go sideways.  Your fireplace probably has some quarter round molding where the brick meets the drywall, peel it off, cut a hole in the drywall at the level where you'll remove the brick, use a long wood bit with extension(s) and drill through the studs.  (IN this scenario remove your brick at the furthest point (left or right) so you only have fish sideways maybe one stud bay.

When you remove the brick, cover everything with tarps...That brick dust gets everywhere...When you have all of your holes drilled around the brick, start smacking it with a cold chisel and a hammer..Remove the brick and you have enough room to install a gang box for power.

You'll obviously need an HDMI extender....Don't bother to try and run an HDMI in there, it's too much of a pain in the butt. 
Post 45 made on Friday October 23, 2020 at 21:07
vwpower44
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We just had a wall give way in a basement. Long story short...

My client moved into a new house. There was a basement media room with a Rear Pro DLP. The customer and I decided to upgrade to an in-expensive Epson Projector and screen and reuse some deftech speakers from his old house. We mounted the screen, then center, then left and rights. While mounting we noticed it was metal studs. No big deal...they do that in basements sometimes. about 5 minutes later, Heard a few snaps then the entire wall started slowly falling inwards towards me. It turned out the entire wall was being held up to the ceiling with 2 drywall screws. Also, the studded wall was not screwed directly into the metal studs because there was the drywall ceiling between the wall and the studs. No drywall tape either. Luckily it wasn't a lot of weight and I was able to catch it and eliminate any damage.
I also added support to the wall for a temporary fix. Had it been an 85" TV, it have been FUBAR.

So the moral of the story is that you can't count on someone else doing things right. There may not be enough cement between the brick and cinder. It could release very easily if the original work was done wrong.
Stay Hungry, Stay Foolish...
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