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Topic:
Sony Projectors-Please Read if you sell them or want to sell them.
This thread has 21 replies. Displaying posts 16 through 22.
Post 16 made on Wednesday January 15, 2020 at 13:01
Fred Harding
Super Member
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At the risk of piling on, Sony documentation and throw distance calculator are very useful.

When installing projection systems, I always check throw and offset for my clients.....
On the West Coast of Wisconsin
Post 17 made on Wednesday January 15, 2020 at 13:18
cma
Super Member
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3,044
Lens shift should be used. If you are setting the projector right side up in an enclosure at ceiling level that is likely your problem. Mount it to the top of the enclosure and set the projector for ceiling mount.
OP | Post 18 made on Wednesday January 15, 2020 at 13:31
radiorhea
Super Member
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Guys

The projector is perfectly lined up in the center. It is just a 10' ceiling with the screen lower.

By flipping the projector to ceiling mount, lens shift all the way down, I am about 3-4" away from the picture hitting the perfect spot.

I do not agree that this slight keystone correction would screw the image up that much.

There was a JVC Pro in its place before(that had keystone correction) and the picture difference was not noticeable.

In this case, the projector is soooooo much better than the old JVC a 5-10% degradation in picture quality will NEVER be noticed.
Drinking upstream from the herd since 1960
Post 19 made on Wednesday January 15, 2020 at 13:37
Archibald "Harry" Tuttle
Advanced Member
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On January 15, 2020 at 13:31, radiorhea said...
Guys

The projector is perfectly lined up in the center. It is just a 10' ceiling with the screen lower.

By flipping the projector to ceiling mount, lens shift all the way down, I am about 3-4" away from the picture hitting the perfect spot.

Can you put the projector on a pipe and drop it to the level you need?
I came into this game for the action, the excitement. Go anywhere, travel light, get in, get out, wherever there's AV trouble, a man alone.
Post 20 made on Wednesday January 15, 2020 at 14:46
Brad Humphrey
Select Member
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February 2004
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Just to be clear, we are talking about the Sony VPL-VW885ES correct?

With that projector perfectly lined up horizontal (meaning we don't need to use any horizontal lens shift). The vertical lens shift on that thing is +85% / -80%
The only way that can not be squaring up on the screen, is if the projector is mounted more than 14" above the top of the screen. In a room with only a 10' ceiling, that would seem to be a smaller screen (96" or less) mounted on the lower part of the wall.

Also note: Depending on the JVC model, the lens shift range was about the same for the old JVCs as the current Sony. If keystone was used on the JVC, then the original installation was BS and trash.
Feel sorry for the customer, not ever getting to see the true beauty of the original JVC projection. Assuming they didn't get a JVC with misaligned panels, the only negative was the weak light output.
Post 21 made on Wednesday January 15, 2020 at 15:06
Ernie Gilman
Yes, That Ernie!
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On January 15, 2020 at 13:01, Fred Harding said...
At the risk of piling on, Sony documentation and throw distance calculator are very useful.

When installing projection systems, I always check throw and offset for my clients.....

Several years ago, I understood from the guy I was working for at the time that we put in the second G90 to be installed in the US. The manual had a lot of English in it, but it was not entirely in English.

An accident with a complete amateur from a couple years before had taught me to verify installation instructions.

Before I would allow the GC to build a ceiling-mount support for this HEAVY projector, I insisted that they install a temporary screen, open up the projector, and verify the measurements in the manual. We set the projector on the floor and determined the distance that would give us the proper screen width. This was a three-tube projector (9", I think). Too close and we would not have been able to fill the screen. Too far and we would have to have reduced the image size, reducing the amount of light thrown at the screen.

We found that the manual had confused the throw, giving screen to lens in a chart as screen to mount. If we hadn't physically tried the thing, time and money would have been wasted.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. “Bernie” Shaw
Post 22 made on Wednesday January 15, 2020 at 15:22
Impaqt
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On January 15, 2020 at 13:31, radiorhea said...
Guys

I do not agree that this slight keystone correction would screw the image up that much.

You would be incorrect on that assumption.

Keystone correction manipulates the image in the digital domain. Not analog. You need to stretch or compress the image. 1/4 to 1/2 the image actually. This digital stretching is VERY noticeable.

The projector is very much in the wrong position or you are off on your setup.
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