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Topic:
Surge protection for POE cameras?
This thread has 21 replies. Displaying posts 16 through 22.
Post 16 made on Friday November 30, 2018 at 22:32
P2P
Long Time Member
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On November 30, 2018 at 20:52, Ernie Gilman said...
"Electrical Code" "in a lot of places" requires surge protection on all low voltage wiring where it exits/enters a building?

Fins,
I see the difficulty. I'm in the big city. So many of the hots and grounds are locked down by the lawyers ready to sue everyone that the situations you describe haven't even come up.

I've been amused to see a dish on a 10' 4x4 next to a front walkway gate. The idea of cameras in trees is pretty scary, so, yeah to surge protection!

As for lightning, is there really anything that can stop it if it hits near a CAT-5 or CAT-6?

Yes!  And actually, this is spelled out in the NEC.  I don't remember exact chapter and verse, but I know it is part of Article 250.
OP | Post 17 made on Friday November 30, 2018 at 23:23
Fins
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On November 30, 2018 at 18:44, davidcasemore said...
It all makes sense now.

Bless your heart, Dave
Civil War reenactment is LARPing for people with no imagination.

OP | Post 18 made on Friday November 30, 2018 at 23:34
Fins
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On November 30, 2018 at 20:52, Ernie Gilman said...
As for lightning, is there really anything that can stop it if it hits near a CAT-5 or CAT-6?

We are treading on dangerous ground with this whole topic. The whole subject is like screaming West*nís name three times to see if he will appear. But to answer your question, in my experience, no. But you can do some things to try to reduce damage or help reduce the odds. Most strikes arenít going to happen near the wire. But without any protection, Iíve seen lightning run through the ground hundreds of yards through tree roots. And Iíve seen where it has traveled probably a thousand yards down a barb wire fence, then jump to a buried wire where the two paths cross. Usually those strikes are degraded enough that surge protection can help. When I installed invisible fences we saw some amazing damage until Panamax designed a surge protector for the fences. But with close hits the Panamax was usually sacrificed.
Civil War reenactment is LARPing for people with no imagination.

Post 19 made on Saturday December 1, 2018 at 02:55
davidcasemore
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On November 30, 2018 at 23:34, Fins said...
... you can do some things to try to reduce damage or help reduce the odds. Most strikes arenít going to happen near the wire. But without any protection, Iíve seen lightning run through the ground hundreds of yards through tree roots. And Iíve seen where it has traveled probably a thousand yards down a barb wire fence, then jump to a buried wire where the two paths cross. Usually those strikes are degraded enough that surge protection can help. When I installed invisible fences we saw some amazing damage until Panamax designed a surge protector for the fences. But with close hits the Panamax was usually sacrificed.

Agreed.

Induction is not your friend here. The strike doesn't even have to be that close. You may not even see a failure until many small surges later.

TPD (in earlier post by Don Heany) is my go-to. ITW is also very good. Both companies make products designed for just about every protocol and wiring scheme we work with (IDC Punch-down, RJ-45, RJ-11, RS-232, RS-this, that and the other, Cat5/6, Dog,too, speaker, cameras, lights, action, BNC, gate power, landscape lighting, phone system extensions, gate intercoms and more!)

Most importantly:

1. Use fiber when you have that option. This gets rid of the problem completely.

2. If installing surge protection you should have a surge device at each end of the run.

3. The surge devices should be installed as close to the exit or entry of the structure as possible.

4. The surge device must be grounded to the electrical service ground.

Arlington Industries (my favorite company) makes an awesome box which can be located outside on a wall, fence or free-standing. A little DIN rail and the proper TPD product and you're good to go.

[Link: aimedia.co]
Fins: Still Slamming' His Trunk on pilgrim's Small Weenie - One Trunk at a Time!
Post 20 made on Saturday December 1, 2018 at 07:33
buzz
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When protecting Ethernet, pay attention to the 10/100/1000 rating because some older devices might not pass 1000.
Post 21 made on Saturday December 1, 2018 at 07:57
Don Heany
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4. The surge device must be grounded to the electrical service ground.

The most often ignored. Have seen a good many of these pieces just ďfloatingĒ.
Post 22 made on Saturday December 1, 2018 at 09:23
buzz
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One point that bothers me about all of these devices is that it is difficult to test and verify that a device is still viable. If the shunting to ground path fails open, data and power will get through, but without protection.
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