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Topic:
Splicing building phone lines
This thread has 17 replies. Displaying posts 16 through 18.
Post 16 made on Monday April 29, 2019 at 18:58
davidcasemore
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On April 27, 2019 at 15:36, Ernie Gilman said...
As with most things, the NEC doesn't say who's going to pay for determining FOR DAMN SURE that those wires aren't being used. That's probably a lot more costly than actually removing the wires.

The same article in the NEC also states that if the cables could POSSIBLY be used in the future they can stay - but each cable has to be labeled, at both ends, stating where the other end of the cable is.

The NEC reason for removing abandoned cables is to reduce the fire load.
Post 17 made on Tuesday April 30, 2019 at 12:00
Ernie Gilman
Yes, That Ernie!
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On April 27, 2019 at 15:52, Mac Burks (39) said...
How about PLAN C? Junction box where the cable currently is and conduit to where they want to route it to.

CONS
1.3M doesn't get to make a huge scotchlok sale.

If, by "junction box," you mean multiple sets of 25 pairs of wire spliced together using scotchloks, you're out of your head.

The more I think about it, the worse an idea a 110 block is. Any wiring of this style (or era!) that uses 66 blocks is made thinking of the option of tapping into it or distribute it, whether with a test set or with another wire paralleled off to somewhere else. 110 blocks are made for a kind of wiring where you NEVER Y off in another direction.

On April 29, 2019 at 18:58, davidcasemore said...
The same article in the NEC also states that if the cables could POSSIBLY be used in the future they can stay - but each cable has to be labeled, at both ends, stating where the other end of the cable is.

The NEC reason for removing abandoned cables is to reduce the fire load.

This is what politicians call "unfunded mandates" -- it's something that the law calls upon people to do while completely sidestepping who pays for it. I've never seen anyone take on the costs and do it unless they were reducing the building to a shell. After all, it doesn't cost much to remove ALL THE WIRE. It costs money to determine which wires need to stay, and then remove the other wires.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. “Bernie” Shaw
Post 18 made on Tuesday April 30, 2019 at 12:42
highfigh
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On April 29, 2019 at 18:58, davidcasemore said...
The same article in the NEC also states that if the cables could POSSIBLY be used in the future they can stay - but each cable has to be labeled, at both ends, stating where the other end of the cable is.

The NEC reason for removing abandoned cables is to reduce the fire load.

Because some people who might do this kind of work are opportunistic and lazy, so someone asks for a wire and they say "Here's a wire".

Not a bad time to post the info-

[Link: mikeholt.com]


Stop fire from spreading
These three Art. 800 requirements reduce the spread of fire or products of combustion:

• Tag future use cables. If you don’t terminate some cables because they are for future use, identify each with a tag that can withstand the environment [800.25]. This distinguishes them from abandoned cables.

• Remove abandoned cables. If a cable doesn’t terminate and isn’t for future use, remove the accessible portion [800.2]. Cables installed in concealed raceways aren’t accessible, so you don’t have to remove them.

• Apply firestopping. Firestop openings in fire-rated walls, floors, and ceilings for electrical equipment. Use firestop material listed for the specific types of wiring methods and construction structures. Use firestop methods approved by the AHJ to maintain the fire-resistance rating of the fire-rated assembly [800.26]
My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."
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