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Unofficial Philips Pronto/Marantz RC5000 FAQ
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Section B4: Working With ProntoEdit:
Learning & Infrared

B4-01   How can I tell whether my learned codes are "clean" or not?

    "Unclean" infrared commands not only take up more of the Pronto's memory than is necessary, but will often not work correctly. The device may sense the command twice, a button may not repeat when held, or the code may simply not work at all. By viewing the hex display of a particular signal in ProntoEdit, one can determine whether the signal is clean or not.

    First, the easiest way to identify a poorly learned code is if it is much longer than other codes learned for the same device. Though some devices can actually use two different formats for different groups of commands (some long, some short), the general rule of thumb is that an abnormally long code is a bad code.

    For this example we will use Sony codes. Although the format of other brands will be different, the same principles apply. To view the hex of a particular code, double-click on the button in ProntoEdit, then double-click on the command (often labeled "Learned"). If a particular set of four digits (usually at the end) are duplicated elsewhere in the code, it is most likely an unclean learn.

    For instance, this is a very dirty code. Notice the repetition of "0452" (the lead out) and how the code seems to just cut off. This was probably learned by just "pressing" the button rather than holding it until the remote beeped:

    0000 0067 0034 0000 0060 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0452 0060 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0452 0060 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0452 0060 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018

    Now here's a somewhat dirty code. Notice the repetition of "0452":

    0000 0067 000b 000d 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0452 0060 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0452

    And, finally, here's a clean code. Notice how "0452" only appears once, at the end:

    0000 0067 0000 000d 0060 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0452

    Generally, the shorter the code the better. But there are exceptions. ProntoEdit is known to improperly learn a number of specific brands, resulting in exceptionally short codes that don't work at all. In this and most other cases, it is best to learn with the base Pronto itself and not through ProntoEdit.


B4-02   Why won't my codes repeat when held down?
    When teaching your commands, you should hold the original button down until the Pronto finishes learning. Do not simply press the button. If you do, the code will learn and will seem to work, but as it was not seen as a repeating code it will not continue to transmit when held down.

    Even if your commands don't need to be repeating, you should still hold the button down when learning as this ensures that a clean hex code is captured (see above).


B4-03   What does 0000, 8000, etc. mean in a hex code?
    The first four digits of a hex code reference the type of code that is to follow:

    0000 - Raw oscilated learned code (also sometimes RC6A codes).
    0100 - Raw unmodulated learned code.
    5000 - RC5 codes.
    5001 - RC5x codes.
    6000 - RC6 codes.
    7000 - Non-standard format database codes (all models).
    8000 - Internal database codes (some models).
    9000 - Automatically detected database codes (some models).
    9001 - Yamaha code format (RAV-2000 only).


B4-04   Why can't I get the Pronto to learn a particular device?
    There are a number of factors that can affect the learning process. A large list of IR learning tips written to help you troubleshoot difficult codes can be found on the Remote Central website.

    One of the first things you can try if you are using ProntoEdit to learn codes is to only use the remote's built-in learning function. Several brands of equipment are known to not learn accurately via ProntoEdit. If you are still having problems you could always check if someone else has posted a CCF that supports your device. It need not match your exact model number: often very little changes between models.


B4-05   Why won't my buttons work twice in a row?
    This is actually caused by the design of your equipment. Your original remote sends a "parity" or "toggle bit", which changes from "0" to "1" between each press. This means there are essentially two codes attached to each button -- and a learning remote can only capture one of them. More information can be found on the Remote Central website.

    With the latest firmware release the Pronto & RC5000 can now learn and operate some toggle-bit IR code formats automatically, however there is no way to access this function manually. To work around this on other devices you will need to tack on a "do nothing" code to the end of each real code to clear your device's buffer. What can that code be? Anything that doesn't affect regular operation. It may be hard to find such a command.

    You could also try creating two pages for every one you have now, each one with a different toggle code. Then, at the end of each code add a jump to the other panel.


B4-06   How can I copy the IR code from one button to another?
    You can copy an entire list of actions by holding the SHIFT key as you drag, with the mouse, the button containing the new commands overtop of the target button.

    If you wish to copy just an IR hex code from one button to another, but not the rest of the action list, the exact method depends on the software version you're using.

    ProntoEdit v1.05 or earlier & RC5000 Setup:

  1. Double-click on the old "source" button.
  2. Double-click on the code entry (typically "[C] Learned").
  3. Hit CTRL-C on your keyboard.
  4. Press CANCEL, CANCEL.
  5. Double-click on the new "target" button.
  6. Press "RC5/6". Press OK.
  7. Double-click on the new "[C] RC5 0 0" entry.
  8. Hit CTRL-V on your keyboard. On this screen you may change the code label if you like, however this is not necessary.
  9. Press OK two times and you're done.
    ProntoEdit v2.0, ProntoProEdit, Touch Screen Setup, RAVedit and CHAD Edit:
  1. Double-click on the old "source" button.
  2. Double-click on the code entry (typically "[C] Learned").
  3. Press the "View IR" button.
  4. In the lower window, right-click over the hex code and pick "Select All".
  5. Hit CTRL-C on your keyboard.
  6. Press CANCEL, CANCEL.
  7. Double-click on the new "target" button.
  8. Press "Set IR".
  9. In the preprogrammed code entry region, change the "Brand" to anything. The "ViewIR" button should light up.
  10. Press the "View IR" button.
  11. In the lower window, right-click over the hex code and pick "Select All".
  12. Hit CTRL-V on your keyboard. Due to a bug in ProntoEdit 2.0, do not change the code label.
  13. Press OK two times and you're done.

    Remember that in ProntoEdit 2.0 you must make a change to the pronto.ini file before you can modify hex codes. See elsewhere in this FAQ for instructions.

    ProntoEdit v4.0 and newer:
  1. Double-click on the old "source" button.
  2. Double-click on the code entry (typically "[C] Learned").
  3. Press the "View IR" button (you should only have to do this once each time you start ProntoEdit).
  4. In the lower window, right-click over the hex code and pick "Select All".
  5. Hit CTRL-C on your keyboard.
  6. Press CANCEL, CANCEL.
  7. Double-click on the new "target" button.
  8. Press "Set IR".
  9. If hex code already exists in the lower window, right-click over it and pick "Select All".
  10. Hit CTRL-V on your keyboard.
  11. Press OK two times and you're done.

B4-07   What is the password for the rcir.mdb infrared database file?
    This tip applies only to ProntoEdit v1.05 or older:

    The password is 75a9024024cd1. You will need to use Microsoft Access 97 or newer to access the file.

    What you can do with it is create a database of infrared codes that are always available. However, this is a lot of work and most people who try decide it is not worth the effort.

    Note that this feature has been removed in all current versions of ProntoEdit, ProntoProEdit and RAVedit.


B4-08   Why won't just tapping the button always work?
    IR Codes sent from a macro are always sent a small number of times. The reason for this is that some equipment needs to receive the same code a few times in succession before it will respond. That's why just tapping the button during normal use may not work -- the Pronto only has enough time to send the code once or twice before your finger is lifted, which is not enough time for the equipment to consider it valid.

    Try creating a new button containing several aliases to the button with the IR code you're having trouble with. In addition, some equipment still may require even a longer "hold" time for macros. As there is no way to set the length of time a code is sent, you will need to experiment with aliasing the same code several times. If this does not work you can try hacking the code in IR Tool (more help on that may be obtained on Remote Central's Pronto Forum).

    RC5000 Users: In addition, the firmware included with RC5000 Setup v2.0 and newer has changed the minimum number of signal repeats to fewer than employed in earlier versions of the software. Owners of Sony and Mitsubishi equipment may discover that they need to "hold" the button instead of merely tapping it before their equipment will respond. The simple solution to this is to make the button into a fake macro. Macros always send each command a minimum number of times, so by inserting a 0.1 second delay before each signal you can operate more reliably and still maintain "quick touch" buttons.

    To avoid the 0.1 second delay, do the same thing but with an empty button:

  1. Create a button somewhere in your configuration, but do not assign any command to it.
  2. Before each of the troublesome buttons, add an alias to this new button.

    Now, each time you press the button, the remote will completely ignore the first step -- since the aliased button does nothing -- but still send the second step, your signal, the proper number of times. Note that repeating codes (buttons that hold down, such as 'fast forward') will no longer operate in that manner. When this problem is finally fixed you can remove all aliases to the fake button and restore repeating codes simply by deleting the empty button.


B4-09   "Test IR" doesn't always work right. Why?
    The "Test IR" function, and sending of signals to the real Pronto while the emulator is running, operates most reliably when the Pronto's screen is active. However, it is suggested that you do not use this function for timing macros and other functions since it does not accurately reflect how the Pronto will truly operate.

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