Your Universal Remote Control Center
RemoteCentral.com
RS-232 & IP Control Forum - View Post
Previous section Next section Up level
Up level
The following page was printed from RemoteCentral.com:

Login:
Pass:
 
 

Topic:
Ip control for new devices
This thread has 3 replies. Displaying all posts.
Post 1 made on Thursday January 31, 2019 at 13:38
Tkarns24
Long Time Member
Joined:
Posts:
August 2010
137
Hey guys, I have sold and upgraded some of my home media stuff. I am now looking to understand and implement Ip control for most if not all my devices and this decision is due to my biggest change which is going from urc MSC 400 and mx 980 to a mrx-2 with a mx-5000. I now want to better control and receive feedback from my new devices in real time.
Device list:
Lg Tv 65UK7700
Sony Avr STR ZA3100ES
NVIDIA Shield
Oppo blu ray
PS 3

I have Ccp and can do a lot my own configurations. I also want to eventually I tie this into my veraplus controller which currently has my cameras, door and window lock as well as my thermostat on it.
Any help on how I can get IP control of my devices and the possible interaction between my veraplus and urc systems would be great. Thanks guys
Post 2 made on Tuesday February 5, 2019 at 14:58
Barry Gordon
Founding Member
Joined:
Posts:
August 2001
2,138
My entire theater is IP based (finally). The Theater control system is an Asrock Beebox PC programmed to handle each device I own over TCP/IP. Most were straight forward with the TCP/IP protocol information being readily available from the device manufacturers. I did all my own coding as I was a programmer at one point in my life.

The theater's Human interface is a Phillips Pronto 9800 (or an iPad or an iPhone or . . .). It deals with the PC using a Wi-Fi link and TCP/IP.

The theater components are:
JVC projector
Anthem AVP60 with a full Atmos speaker configuration (7.4.1)
Amazon FireTV cube
Nvidia Shield
Tivo 4 tuner DVR
Dune 4K player for rendering movies (DVD, BluRay) stored on a NAS
Logitech Transporter for Music

The Shield and the FireTV both required a Videostorm IRUSB Dongle which handles both IR and TCP/IP; all other devices have native TCP/IP RJ45 connections. There is a 16 port switch as part of the theater and all components with the exception of the Pronto run through the switch.

The room has automated full darkening shades (Rollertron motors) and an automated pocket door (Autoslide) both of which are controlled by the PC.

My home is fully IP based for everything except an electric Fireplace and a few TV's which are IR controlled using a Global Cache which is TCP/IP controlled.

There is an Amazon DOT in every room (The theater has the FireTV cube) so full voice control of everything is available. The biggest problem I have with the Voice control is remembering what I named things!

The UDI controller is fully integrated with the Amazon Alexa DOTs. The UDI can issue TCP or UDP network commands from the DOTs giving me full control of everything using voice. I just find the Pronto with its hard buttons easier.
OP | Post 3 made on Tuesday February 5, 2019 at 23:49
Tkarns24
Long Time Member
Joined:
Posts:
August 2010
137
Danm Barry, If you post did not have some gold nuggets of information I would say that you might have just been bragging.lol
Here goes the questions:
Why did you choose to go with a Theater control PC?Could I use the URC MRX2 for the same effect?
When you say "TCP/IP protocol information readily available from the device manufactures" are you taking about calling a support tech up for this information and asking or that its on their websites? I have been having a difficult time finding information about some of my item.
I just purchased the videostorm IRUSB dongle and then found out that the URC module is $79

Also Barry is this in the best place I have gotten no other feedback other than yours


On February 5, 2019 at 14:58, Barry Gordon said...
My entire theater is IP based (finally). The Theater control system is an Asrock Beebox PC programmed to handle each device I own over TCP/IP. Most were straight forward with the TCP/IP protocol information being readily available from the device manufacturers. I did all my own coding as I was a programmer at one point in my life.

The theater's Human interface is a Phillips Pronto 9800 (or an iPad or an iPhone or . . .). It deals with the PC using a Wi-Fi link and TCP/IP.

The theater components are:
JVC projector
Anthem AVP60 with a full Atmos speaker configuration (7.4.1)
Amazon FireTV cube
Nvidia Shield
Tivo 4 tuner DVR
Dune 4K player for rendering movies (DVD, BluRay) stored on a NAS
Logitech Transporter for Music

The Shield and the FireTV both required a Videostorm IRUSB Dongle which handles both IR and TCP/IP; all other devices have native TCP/IP RJ45 connections. There is a 16 port switch as part of the theater and all components with the exception of the Pronto run through the switch.

The room has automated full darkening shades (Rollertron motors) and an automated pocket door (Autoslide) both of which are controlled by the PC.

My home is fully IP based for everything except an electric Fireplace and a few TV's which are IR controlled using a Global Cache which is TCP/IP controlled.

There is an Amazon DOT in every room (The theater has the FireTV cube) so full voice control of everything is available. The biggest problem I have with the Voice control is remembering what I named things!

The UDI controller is fully integrated with the Amazon Alexa DOTs. The UDI can issue TCP or UDP network commands from the DOTs giving me full control of everything using voice. I just find the Pronto with its hard buttons easier.
Post 4 made on Wednesday February 6, 2019 at 11:53
Barry Gordon
Founding Member
Joined:
Posts:
August 2001
2,138
Someone once told me it's not bragging if it is factual, okay I am bragging a bit. I will not buy an A/V device (component) that needs user control unless it has a TCP/IP interface which is fully described. Remember HTTP is just a specifically formatted instance of TCP.

All of my A/V components are IP based with full disclosure either at the manufacturer's web site or within their user manual for the component.

I chose a small footprint PC with all the capabilities I need. I can program any component interface so when new equipment comes out I can handle it. All my components take commands and provide status feedback. There is an IP to IR converter (Global Cache iTach) that is unused at the current time. There is a device with 8 RS232 ports that takes IP commands, also unused at this time. There is an IP based set of relays (Form C) which control the window shades.

Knowing nothing about the URC-MRX2, I googled it. It appears to me to be dumbed down PC. The PC provides infinite flexibility, with total reliance on me for programming it. I program it in Microsoft Visual Basic. I have often toyed with the idea of re-doing it in Node-js, but I tend to leave what works alone. I do not need the services of any "Company" to provide code for the PC. In your case, URC wants to charge you for the module they developed which is fair although a bit pricey. If you are able to write code then a general purpose PC that you can program yourself might end up being a better long term solution.

My theater has been evolutionary in nature. It started with a small Benq projector and IR as the major control paradigm. It has evolved through RS232 to IP. Over the ten or so years of its existence, just about every component has changed, but there has always been a PC as the main control point. The IRUSB dongle is a perfect example. I started trying to use ADB (Android Debug Bridge) to control the Android-based devices (FireTV and Shield). Got it to work but it was slow and inelegant. With the IRUSB it took just a couple of hours to code up a TCP/IP handler on the PC to deal with any number of IRUSB units. The response is identical to that of the native remotes for the FireTV and Shield.

There is only one HID (Human Interface Device), a Philips Pronto Pro 9800. I like the buttons. My iPad and iPhone are also programmed to act as the Theater HID, but seldom used.

I can turn on the entire theater with a simple Alexa voice command ("Alexa, turn on the theater") from anywhere in the house. The PC has a "script" that invokes various functions to perform the theater turn on. A random (1 of 100) music file starts playing. The window shades are closed. If it is still light out the theater doors are closed. The necessary components are turned on in the correct order so as not to confuse HDMI. The AVP is told to select the Tivo DVR as the current input and set the system volume to the correct value for that device. All from a single input that could have come from any one of several devices.

I own the domain "the-gordons.net". You know my name. You can send me an email at the obvious address using my first name and my domain. If you want to continue this discussion I do answer emails. The domain has a web site which you may find interesting.


Hope that helps.

Last edited by Barry Gordon on February 6, 2019 13:51.


Jump to


Protected Feature Before you can reply to a message...
You must first register for a Remote Central user account - it's fast and free! Or, if you already have an account, please login now.

Please read the following: Unsolicited commercial advertisements are absolutely not permitted on this forum. Other private buy & sell messages should be posted to our Marketplace. For information on how to advertise your service or product click here. Remote Central reserves the right to remove or modify any post that is deemed inappropriate.

Hosting Services by ipHouse