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Topic:
NG3000 code generation
This thread has 8 replies. Displaying all posts.
Post 1 made on Tuesday May 22, 2007 at 23:48
FuriousM
Lurking Member
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I've read up on MakeHEX and I don't seem to be getting it. I got the NEC codes for my Yamaha DVD player and I need to convert them to a Pronto usable format. I learned PAUSE from my remote but I want to use the codes and not learned functions. Here is learned PAUSE:
0000 0073 0026 0000 0144 00A4 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 003D 0014 003D 0014 003D 0014 003D 0014 003D 0014 0014 0014 003D 0014 003D 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 003D 0014 003D 0014 003D 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 003D 0014 0014 0014 0014 0014 003D 0014 003D 0014 003D 0014 003D 0014 003D 0014 0014 0014 05B4 0144 0052 0014 0DA0 0144 0052 0014 00A4

Pause from the Yamaha doc is:
Custom code: 7C
Data code: 83

What do I do to use the custom/data codes?
P.S. The Yamaha IR code doc can be downloaded at
[Link: gearcrossing.com]

Thanks!
Post 2 made on Wednesday May 23, 2007 at 00:50
Lyndel McGee
RC Moderator
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12,427
The code you posted follows the NEC protocol. (See Barry Gordon's document in the Classic Pronto Files Section, User Documentation Subsection on the Pronto Hex IR format)

To use the codes from Yamaha PDF as input to MakeHex, you need to know 3 things. 1) The Protocol (determines which IRP file to use), the Device Number (decimal), and a set of Functions (decimal range).

From the PDF, note that 7C is hexadecimal for 7*16 + 12 = 124 (decimal) and 83 is hexadecimal for 8*16 + 3 = 131 (decimal).

So, you can use MakeHex and the file NEC1.irp to generate a set of codes. Edit this file to use Device 124 and then generate all functions 0..255. From there, you should be able to take function 131 and test it to see if it will work. Bet it does!!!

:)

Lyndel
Lyndel McGee
Philips Pronto Addict/Beta Tester
Post 3 made on Wednesday May 23, 2007 at 08:49
johnsfine
IR Expert
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September 2002
5,159
On May 23, 2007 at 00:50, Lyndel McGee said...
The code you posted follows the NEC protocol.

Correct. It is NEC1 protocol, device 124, function 131 (as you determined from the pdf file).

(See Barry
Gordon's document in the Classic Pronto Files Section,
User Documentation Subsection on the Pronto Hex IR format)

Why should an ordinary user look at that? He has no reason to want to know the internal structure of a Pronto Hex string.

If you want to decode a Pronto Hex string (find out the protocol, device and function) use IrTool and DecodeIr.dll
[Link: remotecentral.com]
[Link: john.fine.home.comcast.net]

So, you can use MakeHex and the file NEC1.irp to generate
a set of codes. Edit this file to use Device 124 and
then generate all functions 0..255. From there, you should
be able to take function 131 and test it to see if it
will work. Bet it does!!!

I agree. But two more comments:

1) Notice the learned signal is modulated at 36Khz, where NEC1.irp specifies 38Khz. Probably the learning is wrong and 38Khz is correct. But maybe this is an unusual device and 36Khz is correct. Probably the IR receiver in the device doesn't care much whether the modulation is 36Khz or 38Khz. But maybe it cares. Most similar IR receivers have a spec saying that a 10% error in modulation frequency degrades the signal the same amount as a factor of two increase in the distance between the remote and the device. Both of those (frequency error and distance) multiply their effects with each other and with degradation due to the signal angles. This 5.6% error in frequency (36 vs. 38) might have detectable consequences at some angle and distance.

2) See instructions in the MakeHex readme for geting MakeHex output labeled in hex rather than decimal. That should be easier than individually translating each function code from the pdf from hex to decimal.
OP | Post 4 made on Wednesday May 23, 2007 at 11:56
FuriousM
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2
Thanks for the very helpful comments. I understand how to use MakeHEX now (well it was kind of spelled out exactly).

The learned code is probably slightly wrong. Here is why. I have a Sony hard button universal remote. Originally I used my Yamaha remote to send the codes to the Sony remote (before I got my NG3000). When programming my NG3000 last night, not having the Yamaha remote handy, I learned one code into the NG3000 using the Sony remote as the source instead of the Yamaha remote as I probably should have.

Thanks again!
Post 5 made on Monday June 11, 2007 at 15:47
roden
Lurking Member
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June 2007
4
I'm getting frustrated with this. I know I'm not that stupid, I just can't get my brain wrapped around this process. I'm trying to use discrete functions that are not on the original remote but the manufacturer has a pdf that give additional discrete functions. Here is the information that they have provided me.

NEC Cutom Code: 1AE8h
Function: Power ON
HEX: 0x54
Decimal: 84

I tried to figure out MakeHex but just can't seem to grasp it. I think I need to take another trip to Star$$$$s. Maybe it will give my brain the need boost.

Thanks Guys.
Post 6 made on Monday June 11, 2007 at 16:11
johnsfine
IR Expert
Joined:
Posts:
September 2002
5,159
On June 11, 2007 at 15:47, roden said...
NEC Cutom Code: 1AE8h

Manufacturers almost never give the bit of information that tells you whether it is what MakeHex calls NEC1 vs. NEC2. Sometimes (rarely) they even say "NEC" when it is what MakeHex calls "NECx1" or "NECx2". So I would guess NEC1, but I'm not sure.

Also, many manufacturers express the custom code using an encoding different from that documented by NEC. So "1AE8" probably has the standard meaning, but that isn't certain.

MakeHex uses a "Device Number" instead of a Custom Code. The device number consists of the two halves of the custom code seperately converted to decimal: 1A hex is 26 decimal and E8 hex is 232 decimal, so in MakeHex that is
Device=26.232

Decimal: 84

Based on all the above best estimates:

NEC1 Device Code: 26.232 Function: 84
0000 006D 0022 0002 0157 00AC 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0689 0157 0056 0015 0E94

If that isn't right, post a learned signal from the same device. That would tell me what the protocol and device code really are (using IrTool and DecodeIr.dll)
Post 7 made on Monday June 11, 2007 at 16:20
johnsfine
IR Expert
Joined:
Posts:
September 2002
5,159
I Found two CCF for Adcom devices files in which NEC:26.232:84 is the discrete ON command:

[Link: remotecentral.com]
[Link: remotecentral.com]

Both of those are commented as being "NEC2" but both are generated signals that lack the part that distinguishes NEC1 from NEC2.

Anyway, if those work, I guess you'll find it easier to take signals from those CCF files than to generate other versions with MakeHex.
Post 8 made on Tuesday June 12, 2007 at 00:43
roden
Lurking Member
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June 2007
4
I will give this try tomorrow. Thanks for your help.
Post 9 made on Saturday June 16, 2007 at 18:42
roden
Lurking Member
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June 2007
4
johnsfine

unfortunately you code did not work :-( RTI managed to get the code converted properly. I now have the discretes for power on, power off, am and fm. Thanks for you help. I used makehex and came up with the same code as you. Your example helped me with using makehex. Thanks. Here's the code for power on that RTI converted for me.

0000 006D 0022 0002 014E 00A7 0015 0015 0015 003F 0015 0015 0015 003F 0015 003F 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 003F 0015 0015 0015 003F 0015 003F 0015 003F 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 003F 0015 0015 0015 003F 0015 0015 0015 003F 0015 0015 0015 003F 0015 003F 0015 0015 0015 003F 0015 0015 0015 003F 0015 0015 0015 003F 0015 05B7 014E 0054 0015 0E53


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