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Sappy email file
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Post 1 made on Tuesday June 13, 2006 at 00:48
Jay In Chicago
Founding Member
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December 2001
1,658
When things in your life seem almost too much to handle, when 24 hours in a day are not enough, remember the mayonnaise jar and the 2 beers.

A professor stood before his philosophy class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, he wordlessly picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls. He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

The professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls. He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was.

The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else. He asked once more if the jar was full. The students responded with a unanimous "yes."

The professor then produced two beers from under the table and poured the entire contents into the jar effectively filling the empty space between the sand. The students laughed.

"Now," said the professor as the laughter subsided, "I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life. The golf balls are the important things--- your family, your health, your friends and your favorite passions---and if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.

The pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house and your car.

The sand is everything else---the small stuff. "If you put the sand into the jar first," he continued, "there is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls. The same goes for life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff you will never have room for the things that are important to you.

"Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with your children. Spend time with your parents. Visit with grandparents. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your spouse out to dinner. Play another 18. There will always be time to clean the house and fix the disposal. Take care of the golf balls first---the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand."


One of the students raised her hand and inquired what the beer represented. The professor smiled. "I'm glad you asked".

It just goes to show you that no matter how full your life may seem, there's always room for a couple of beers with a friend."
Jet Rack ... It's what's for breakfast
Post 2 made on Tuesday June 13, 2006 at 01:15
Damik
Loyal Member
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Posts:
October 2005
6,203
djy will probably drink to that, and I concur
I knew this was a mistake; my grip on reality's not too good at the best of times. Glitz, in "The Ultimate Foe"
Post 3 made on Tuesday June 13, 2006 at 03:48
djy
RC Moderator
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August 2001
34,363
Yup . . . and it's one of the ones I found in my "engineeing" trawl of the web, albeit worded slightly differently.
Post 4 made on Tuesday June 13, 2006 at 04:27
Mr Griffiths
It's my lucky day!
Joined:
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February 2005
2,677
On October 30, 2003 at 18:23, bob griffiths said...
A lecturer stood before his philosophy class and
had some items in
Front of him. When the class began, wordlessly,
he picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise
jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls.
He then asked the students if the jar was full.
They agreed that it was.
So the lecturer then picked up a box of gravel
and poured it into the jar. He shook the jar lightly.
The gravel rolled into the open areas between
golf balls. He then asked the students again if
the jar was full.
They agreed it was. The lecturer next picked up
a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of
course, the sand filled up everything else. He
asked once more if the jar was full. The students
responded with a unanimous "yes."
The lecturer then produced two cans of beer
from under the table and poured the entire contents
into the jar, effectively filling the empty space
between the sand. The students laughed. "Now,"
said the lecturer, as the laughter subsided, "I
want you to recognize that this jar represents
your life. The golf balls are the important things--your
family, your children, your health, your friends,
your favorite passions--things that if everything
else was lost and only they remained, your life
would still be full. "The gravel is the other
things that matter like your job, your house,
your car. The sand is everything else--the small
stuff.
"If you put the sand into the jar first," he
continued, "there is no room for the gravel or
the golf balls. The same goes for life. If you
spend all your time and energy on the small stuff,
you will never have room for the things that are
important to you. Pay attention to the things
that are significant to your happiness. Play with
your children. Take time to get health checkups.
Take your partner out to dinner. Play another
18.
There will always be time to clean the house,
and repair the disposal.
"Take care of the golf balls first, the things
that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest
is just sand."

One of the students raised her hand and inquired
what the beer represented. The lecturer smiled.
"I'm glad you asked. It just goes to show you
that no matter how full your life may seem, there's
always room for a couple of beers."

It is a good un


[Link: remotecentral.com]
Post 5 made on Tuesday June 13, 2006 at 18:23
Anthony
Ultimate Member
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Posts:
May 2001
28,714
oldie but a goodie. I am sure we all recognized it from the first few lines.
...
OP | Post 6 made on Tuesday June 13, 2006 at 22:11
Jay In Chicago
Founding Member
Joined:
Posts:
December 2001
1,658
A place for them to be put to rest perhaps.
Jet Rack ... It's what's for breakfast
OP | Post 7 made on Tuesday July 18, 2006 at 02:57
Jay In Chicago
Founding Member
Joined:
Posts:
December 2001
1,658
I know this is long. If you're one of those who don't have time for these, then you're the one who should read this most of all. Enjoy!


Subject: The Cab Ride - A MUST READ

THE CAB RIDE
Twenty years ago, I drove a cab for a living. When I arrived at
2:30 a.m., the building was dark except for a single light in a ground
floor window.
Under these circumstances, many drivers would just honk once or
twice, wait a minute, and then drive away.

But I had seen too many impoverished people who depended on taxis as their only means of transportation. Unless a situation smelled of danger, I always went to the door. This passenger might be someone who needs my assistance, I reasoned to myself.

So I walked to the door and knocked. "Just a minute," answered a
frail, elderly voice. I could hear something being dragged across the
floor. After a long pause, the door opened. A small woman in her 80's
stood before me.
She was wearing a print dress and a pillbox hat with a veil pinned on
it, like somebody out of a 1940s movie.

By her side was a small nylon suitcase The apartment looked as if
no one had lived in it for years. All the furniture was covered with
sheets.

There were no clocks on the walls, no knickknacks or utensils on
the counters. In the corner was a cardboard box filled with photos and
glassware.

"Would you carry my bag out to the car?" she said. I took the
suitcase to the cab, then returned to assist the woman.

She took my arm and we walked slowly toward the curb.
She kept thanking me for my kindness.

"It's nothing," I told her. "I just try to treat my passengers the
way I would want my mother treated."
"Oh, you're such a good boy," she said.
When we got in the cab, she gave me an address, and then asked,
"Could you drive through downtown?"

"It's not the shortest way," I answered quickly.
"Oh, I don't mind," she said. "I'm in no hurry. I'm on my way to a
hospice."
I looked in the rear-view mirror. Her eyes were glistening.



"I don't have any family left," she continued. "The doctor says I
don't have very long." I quietly reached over and shut off the meter.
"What route would you like me to take?" I asked.

For the next two hours, we drove through the city. She showed me
the building where she had once worked as an elevator operator.
We drove through the neighborhood where she and her husband had
lived when they were newlyweds. She had me pull up in front of a
furniture warehouse that had once been a ballroom where she had gone
dancing as a girl.
Sometimes she'd ask me to slow in front of a particular building
or corner and would sit staring into the darkness, saying nothing.
As the first hint of sun was cr easing the horizon, she suddenly
said, "I'm tired. Let's go now"
We drove in silence to the address she had given me.
It was a low building, like a small convalescent home, with a
driveway that passed under a portico.
Two orderlies came out to the cab as soon as we pulled up. They
were solicitous and intent, watching her every move. They must have
been expecting her.
I opened the trunk and took the small suitcase to the door. The
woman was already seated in a wheelchair.
"How much do I owe you?" she asked, reaching into her purse.
"Nothing," I said
"You have to make a living," she answered.
"There are other passengers," I responded.
; Almost without thinking, I bent and gave her a hug. She held onto
me tightly.
"You gave an old woman a little moment of joy," she said. "Thank
you. " I squeezed her hand, and then walked into the dim morning light.
Behind me, a door shut. It was the sound of the closing of a life.
I didn't pick up any more passengers that shift. I drove
aimlessly lost in thought. For the rest of that day, I could hardly
talk.
What if that woman had gotten an angry driver, or one who was
impatient to end his shift?
What if I had refused to take the run, or had honked once, then
driven away?
On a quick review, I don't think that I have done anything more
important in my life.
We're conditioned to think that our lives revolve around great
moments. Bu t great moments often catch us unaware-beautifully wrapped in what others may consider a small one.

PEOPLE MAY NOT REMEMBER EXACTLY WHAT 'YOU DID, OR WHAT YOU SAID,
~BUT~THEY WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL.

You won't get any big surprise in 10 days if you send this to ten
people. But, you might help make the world a little kinder and more
compassionate by sending it on.

Thank you, my friend...

Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we are here we
might as well dance.


May God Bless You!
Jet Rack ... It's what's for breakfast


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