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LIRC ir codes into NEC protocol?
This thread has 9 replies. Displaying all posts.
Post 1 made on Wednesday February 19, 2020 at 07:48
theremoteman
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Hello

is there a way to convert LIRC hex code like in here for example:
[Link: sourceforge.net]

so for example this one:
"TAPE_STOP 0x00000000000011E8"

into a HEX or pronto hex in NEC protocol?
or can I get data from it to know the DSF parameters, and put it inside IrScrutinizer to generate the pronto code.
Post 2 made on Wednesday February 19, 2020 at 09:34
Barf
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In IrScrutinizer, select Import -> Lirc. You can even import from URL directly, not only from local files or the clipboard.

Having said that, the linked file does not decode to anything useful, in particular not to NEC.
OP | Post 3 made on Saturday February 22, 2020 at 11:23
theremoteman
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On February 19, 2020 at 09:34, Barf said...
In IrScrutinizer, select Import -> Lirc. You can even import from URL directly, not only from local files or the clipboard.

Having said that, the linked file does not decode to anything useful, in particular not to NEC.

Hi

why decoding it isn't useful? it says that the codes in those files are in LIRC, so I assume I can use IrScrutinizer to decode from LIRC to NEC no?
Post 4 made on Saturday February 22, 2020 at 12:03
Barf
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Not all IR signals are NEC, and not all Lirc files either. Here is one that is:
[Link: sourceforge.net]

The given file contains signals that neither I nor IrScrutinizer recognize, certainly not NEC. Either the author has a very uncommon device, or he made a mistake.
OP | Post 5 made on Saturday February 22, 2020 at 12:26
theremoteman
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is there a way from this config file to understand which ones are NEC and which aren't?
Post 6 made on Saturday February 22, 2020 at 13:50
Barf
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Import into IrScrutinizer?
OP | Post 7 made on Sunday February 23, 2020 at 10:39
theremoteman
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On February 22, 2020 at 13:50, Barf said...
Import into IrScrutinizer?

and IrScrutinizer will tell if it can't convert it into NEC?
Post 8 made on Sunday February 23, 2020 at 11:06
Barf
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It appears that there is a misunderstanding somewhere. Most ("most") IR signals are not NEC, just as most vehicles are not airplanes. If a signal is not NEC, say it is RC5, there is no way to convert it to NEC, just as you cannot convert an automobile into an airplane.

IrScrutinizer will recognize NEC signals as such, if it is recognized as something else (say RC5), it is clearly not NEC. If it is not recognized at all, it is likely somehow fawlty read. In rare cases, it may be a protocol that IrScrutinizer does not know yet.
OP | Post 9 made on Sunday February 23, 2020 at 12:56
theremoteman
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On February 23, 2020 at 11:06, Barf said...
It appears that there is a misunderstanding somewhere. Most ("most") IR signals are not NEC, just as most vehicles are not airplanes. If a signal is not NEC, say it is RC5, there is no way to convert it to NEC, just as you cannot convert an automobile into an airplane.

IrScrutinizer will recognize NEC signals as such, if it is recognized as something else (say RC5), it is clearly not NEC. If it is not recognized at all, it is likely somehow fawlty read. In rare cases, it may be a protocol that IrScrutinizer does not know yet.

As long as I have the pronto hex code, for example:
"0000 006e 0022 0002 0154 00aa 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0040 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 06a2 0154 0055 0015 0e3d"

and I try to transmit it via comsumerIR of an android app for example, should I care if the pronto hex is in RC5 protocol or NE protocol for example or I can just transmit it as is?
is the type of the protocol is relevant only when I want to convert a hex code into a pronto hex code?

thank you for the explnations
Post 10 made on Monday February 24, 2020 at 08:44
Barf
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should I care if the pronto hex is in RC5 protocol or NE protocol for example or I can just transmit it as is?

you can in principle transmit them "as is". However, decoding them has a few advantages_

1. Many of the signals you find at this site, or learn yourself, are "dirty": The measured durations are slightly off, in some cases a capure even contains multiple copies of the real signal. Using "dirty" signals decreases reliability and range.

2. A decoded signal (more precisely, the parameters) take up much less space than a number of durations. Important if you have little memory and many signals.

3. You have a better "understanding" if you have the decodes, for example if you decide to go hunting for not documented commands.


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