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help deciphering discrete code info from Manufacturer
This thread has 8 replies. Displaying all posts.
Post 1 made on Wednesday November 5, 2014 at 13:03
Audible Solutions
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We have to deal with an Evervue Mirrorvue TV and remote only has toggle power. The manufacturer claims discrete codes exist but has only sent over protocol information. Perhaps someone here can make sense of this data.

The RC code is NEC 6122.
Power ON is 0xAE // 51
Power OFF is 0xAF // 50

I keep meaning to learn IR conversion but I have not. Anyone know how to turn this data into a usable IR code?

Alan and Bill Reshes.
"This is a Christian Country,Charlie,founded on Christian values...when you can't put a nativiy scene in front fire house at Christmas time in Nacogdoches Township, something's gone terribly wrong"
Post 2 made on Wednesday November 5, 2014 at 17:58
SysIntegration
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Not sure how they got that hex to decimal conversion.....

Let's make friends with IRScrutinizer. This is the program you should be using to generate codes when the manufacture is too lazy to give you hex.

Off to the generate Tab.

We are going to assume the protocol is NEC1. It might be NEC2 or other NEC variant, but in most cases when list as above, we can assume NEC1.

Then the fun guessing game of which number is the device code and which is the subdevice. Did they reverse it? Let's see.

protocol= nec1
device (d)= 61
subdevice (s) = 22

Function (f) = normally you would convert the hex to decimal 0xAE =/= 51. It equals 174. So we are guessing more. Lets generate both.

Function 51:

0000 006C 0022 0002 015B 00AD 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 05F7 015B 0057 0016 0E6C

Function 50:

0000 006C 0022 0002 015B 00AD 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 05F7 015B 0057 0016 0E6C

---or---

Function 174 (0xAE converted to decimal)

0000 006C 0022 0002 015B 00AD 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 05F7 015B 0057 0016 0E6C

Function 175 (0xAF converted to decimal)

0000 006C 0022 0002 015B 00AD 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 05F7 015B 0057 0016 0E6C
0101001101111001011100110100100101101110011101000110010101100111011100100110000101110100011010010110111101101110
Post 3 made on Wednesday November 5, 2014 at 20:21
3FG
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SysIntegration is correct that we may need to guess.  If you can learn the Power toggle code and post e.g. the Pronto Hex here, we can eliminate the question about the device and subdevice numbers.

6122 may be a decimal number but it may also be in hexadecimal format.  Even if that is true, we still don't know whether they mean D=0x61, S=0x22, or D=0x86, S= 0x44 (bit reversed on a single byte) or D=0x44, S=0x86 (bit reversed on both bytes).

Regarding the discrete function numbers, I suspect "Power ON is 0xAE // 51" actually should have been written 0xAE//0x51, because 0xAE and 0x51 are binary complements.  Perhaps the function number is 81 decimal, but all of this is just a guess.

It would really help to have one learned signal.

 
OP | Post 4 made on Thursday November 6, 2014 at 10:38
Audible Solutions
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Will try but this is a consultant job and the display has not arrived. Will see what we can do with respect to getting some of the codes learned.

Thank you for the help
"This is a Christian Country,Charlie,founded on Christian values...when you can't put a nativiy scene in front fire house at Christmas time in Nacogdoches Township, something's gone terribly wrong"
Post 5 made on Monday November 17, 2014 at 17:49
goldilox27
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I have a similar situation. I needed discreet IR codes for a Sharp PN-L702 monitor. The manufacturer's rep sent me a document that says it follows the '48 bit code standard of the Association for Electric Home Appliances'. For 'power on' it would be 0x555AF468808A where the only thing that changes for the different functions is the last 4 bytes (808A). How do I change these 48 bit commands into the modulated Pronto hex format that my AMX IR edit program can understand?
Post 6 made on Monday November 17, 2014 at 22:04
SysIntegration
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On November 17, 2014 at 17:49, goldilox27 said...
I have a similar situation. I needed discreet IR codes for a Sharp PN-L702 monitor. The manufacturer's rep sent me a document that says it follows the '48 bit code standard of the Association for Electric Home Appliances'. For 'power on' it would be 0x555AF468808A where the only thing that changes for the different functions is the last 4 bytes (808A). How do I change these 48 bit commands into the modulated Pronto hex format that my AMX IR edit program can understand?

Already posted =)

[Link: remotecentral.com]

We can figure out the logistics later.
0101001101111001011100110100100101101110011101000110010101100111011100100110000101110100011010010110111101101110
Post 7 made on Monday November 17, 2014 at 23:08
3FG
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On the off chance that you may want to know more about these signals: The Association for Electric Home Appliances is a Japanese organization called Kaseikyo in Japan.  They have defined an IR protocol (termed Kaseikyo, generally) which is sometimes used by Panasonic, Denon, Fujitsu, Mitsubishi, Teac, Sharp, etc.  This particular version of the Kaseikyo protocol is also known as SharpDVD (because it was first seen in Sharp DVD players)

Each byte in 0x555AF468808A should be read with the bits reversed.  The basic structure is:

55    01010101 -> 10101010 = 0xAA = 170 Sharp OEM designator
5A    01011010 -> 10100101 = 0x5A =   90 Sharp OEM designator
F       Always 0xF in SharpDVD
4       0100 -> 0010 = 0x2  = 2     Device number
68     01101000 -> 00010110 = 0x16 = 22    Subdevice number
80     10000000 -> 00000001 = 0x1 = 1      Function number
8       Always 0x8 in SharpDVD
A       Check sum  (XOR of previous 5 nibbles).
So you can generate the Pronto Hex with e.g. IrScutinizer by selecting SharpDVD, and entering 2 in the D box, 22 (or0x16) in the S box, and 1 in the F box.  Other functions can be generated by reversing the bits in the second to last byte, and entering the result into the F box.
Post 8 made on Tuesday November 18, 2014 at 11:28
goldilox27
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Holy smokes! backwards bytes; that makes sense. I guess it probably has something to do with LSB/MSB. Thank you for taking the time to break it down, piece by piece. You are the man!
Post 9 made on Tuesday November 18, 2014 at 11:29
goldilox27
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Thank you! I don't know why I didn't find it the first time I searched.


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