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Discrete codes for Harman Kardon AVR132
This thread has 6 replies. Displaying all posts.
Post 1 made on Thursday March 24, 2011 at 17:26
hakha4
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Hi!
I'm sending Ir with Global Cache GC-100 to Mainlobby. I have learned codes for my satellite box with the Global Cache learning utility and every code works ok. My problem is that learned codes for HK AVR132 DON'T work. I've tried with ON/OFF codes for other HK receivers mainly from remotecentral with no succes and also tried learned codes with IRWidget/irscope with same result. I know from irscope that the protocol is NEC1 128:212. It seems that I've got an odd receiver since there is almost nothing to find on internet regarding codes. I'm a little desperate and I don't have enough knowledge to solve this problem. I appreciate i someone could help me out. Is there something special about learning HK's ir codes? Does someone have working Hex codes for HK AVR132?
Regards Hucke
Post 2 made on Thursday March 24, 2011 at 19:48
Jasonvp
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Are you sure the protocol is NEC1 128:212 and not NEC1 128:112 ?
OP | Post 3 made on Friday March 25, 2011 at 01:27
hakha4
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Hi
Sorry,slipped when printing,it should be 128:112. As an example if I try to learn 'ON' with
IRWidget I get result below when exported as Pronto :

Protocol=NEC1 Device=128.112 OBC=192 (Pronto from signal)
0000 006D 0026 0000 0156 00AB 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 003F 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 0016 0016 0016 0015 0685 0157 0055 0016 0E40 0157 0055 0015 4634
Does this code make sense ??
Regards Hucke
Post 4 made on Friday March 25, 2011 at 02:39
3FG
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Yes, it is the standard HK IR signal for Discrete On. However, the Pronto Hex represention, while accurately showing the learned signal, is probably not exactly the signal GC wants to see.
As learned:
0000 006D 0026 0000 0156 00AB 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 003F 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 0016 0016 0016 0015 0685 0157 0055 0016 0E40 0157 0055 0015 4634

Better:
0000 006D 0022 0002 0156 00AB 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 003F 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 0016 0016 0016 0015 0685 0157 0055 0016 0E40

This means 22H (34 decimal) burst pairs of the IR signal, followed by 2 burst pairs that are a "ditto", or a repeat.  The learned signal doesn't divide up the regular and repeated parts, and includes a partially completed second ditto.

So in IRscope, go to the Export Menu and change "Export from learned" to "Export from decode".  That will clean up the signals, and probably GC will be happier.
You'll need the irp file, which is part of the MakeHex distribution.  Get the MakeHex GUI also.

BTW, you'll likely find some device 130.114 signals also. 
OP | Post 5 made on Friday March 25, 2011 at 04:59
hakha4
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Thank's alot for helping me out. Is there some special considerations with Nec1 protocol and GC-100? I can´t get any command to work with HK. I know GC-100 works ok and tried Ir-sensor from working channels. Trying back and forth gives same dissapointing results (se below)

ON learned with IRWidget and orig remote:
Protocol=NEC1 Device=128.112 OBC=192 (Pronto from decode)
0000 006D 0022 0002 0157 00AC 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0689 0157 0056 0015 0E94

ON learned with GC ir-learner and orig remote:
0000 006D 0000 0024 015A 00A8 0018 0014 0018 0014 0018 0014 0018 0014 0018 0014 0018 0014 0018 0014 0017 003D 0018 0014 0018 0014 0018 0014 0018 0014 0017 003D 0017 003D 0017 003D 0018 0014 0018 0014 0018 0014 0018 0014 0018 0014 0018 0014 0018 0014 0017 003D 0017 003D 0017 003D 0017 003D 0017 003D 0017 003D 0017 003D 0017 003D 0018 0014 0018 0014 0016 0689 0156 0055 0015 02F8

ON learned with IRWidget and Sunwave (learned/working)remote:
Protocol=NEC1 Device=128.112 OBC=192 (Pronto from decode)
0000 006D 0022 0002 0157 00AC 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0689 0157 0056 0015 0E94

ON learned with GC ir-learner and Sunwave (learned/working)remote:
0000 006D 0000 0024 0155 00AC 0015 0017 0015 0017 0015 0017 0015 0017 0015 0017 0015 0017 0015 0017 0016 003F 0015 0017 0015 0017 0015 0017 0015 0017 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0015 0017 0015 0017 0015 0017 0015 0017 0015 0017 0015 0017 0015 0017 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0015 0017 0015 0017 0014 0692 0156 0056 0014 02F8

Code created with MakeHex:
Protocol=nec1 Device=128.112 Function=192
Device Code: 128.112 (0x80.0x70) Function: 192 (0xC0)
0000 006D 0022 0002 0157 00AC 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0041 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0689 0157 0056 0015 0E94


Code You provided :
0000 006D 0022 0002 0156 00AB 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 003F 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 003F 0016 0016 0016 0016 0015 0685 0157 0055 0016 0E40

It seems that the GC-learner isn't learning ok according to your previous discussion.
Any idea how to solve this ? I'm kind of new to this confusing buissines. Why don't manufactors of electronic equipment have codes for public ???
Regards Hucke
Ps by the way what's the correct setting for IRP data format in IRscope?
Post 6 made on Saturday March 26, 2011 at 02:05
3FG
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Taking the easy one first, the correct format for IRP notation is whatever is easier for you to read. It doesn't affect the operation of the program.

All of the IR signals above are recognizable as NEC1, but the two learned by the GC ir-learner aren't exactly correct. In case you don't know, NEC1 is the most prevalent IR protocol in use. In fact, NEC1 is used in more designs than all the other protocols put together. It is very well understood, and is documented by NEC. Pronto Hex is also well understood--there's a document on this site which explains it.

I downloaded GC's Convert utility and looked at its results. The Convert program does not handle the repeating aspect of NEC1 correctly in the Pronto Hex representation, neither converting to or from it. That's a little puzzling since the GC IR format (available in "GC-100 API Specification" at GC's site) is quite similar to the Pronto Hex format, except that the individual durations are given in decimal rather than hexadecimal notation, and a device address is included. The main difference is that Pronto Hex specifies the number of burst pairs that are 1) sent once, and 2) repeated. GC specifies the number of repeats, and the offset to the repeating burst pairs.

I took a shot at writing the NEC 1 Power On signal in GC format.
sendir,mod-addr:conn-addr,4,38000,2,67,343,172,21,22,21,22,21,22,21,22,21,22,21,22,21,22,21,65,21,22,21,
22,21,22,21,22,21,65,21,65,21,65,21,22,21,22,21,22,21,22,21,22,21,22,21,22,21,65,21,
65,21,65,21,65,21,65,21,65,21,65,21,65,21,22,21,22,21,1673,343,86,21,3732

Maybe you can try that (perhaps stripping out "sendir,").
OP | Post 7 made on Saturday March 26, 2011 at 13:24
hakha4
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Hi and Thank's!!
Finally I'm making progress. Your GC formatted code works and now I figured out how to learn the rest. GC-learner DON'T work but with IRWidget getting the command ID and MakeHex creating code it works. The advantage with problem's are that you learn something new !
Once again thanks for helping me out.
Hucke


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