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Topic:
Klipsch IR Codes
This thread has 4 replies. Displaying all posts.
Post 1 made on Wednesday July 10, 2019 at 20:43
Dodgers Fan
New Member
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July 2019
1
Anyone know how I can convert the following hex codes to .ccf? ProntoEdit does not acknowledge NEC1 protocol.

0x 807F 1AES
0x 807F 03FC
0x 807F 0659
0x 807F 01FE

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Benny Carino
Post 2 made on Wednesday July 10, 2019 at 22:49
Impaqt
RC Moderator
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October 2002
5,900
What device and what are these codes supposed to be? do you have the entire document?
I'm no engineer, but I did stay at a Motel 6 last night!
Post 3 made on Thursday July 11, 2019 at 01:00
Ernie Gilman
Yes, That Ernie!
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December 2001
29,300
Yeah, like he said.

What have you got, what are you trying to do, and what have you tried? Sharing the brand AND model is always important.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. “Bernie” Shaw
Post 4 made on Thursday July 11, 2019 at 02:41
Barf
Long Time Member
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August 2013
207
On July 10, 2019 at 20:43, Dodgers Fan said...
Anyone know how I can convert the following hex codes to .ccf? ProntoEdit does not acknowledge NEC1 protocol.

0x 807F 1AES
0x 807F 03FC
0x 807F 0659
0x 807F 01FE

The NEC1 protocol has 32 bits of data, which we use to call device (D), subdevice (S, often 255-D) and function code (F), then comes the 1-complement of F (255-F).

Note that the first and second byte of the numbers sum up to 0xFF, as does the third and fourth. (Assuming that the first one is 807F 1AE5 not 807F 1AES...)

with this interpretation, you can put these parameters into IrScrutinizer (enter "0x80" as D etc, i.e. 4 characters ) and render Pronto hex within that program. For example, the first one comes out as

0000 006C 0022 0002 015B 00AD 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 05F7 015B 0057 0016 0E6C

There is another possible interpretation (no-one can be sure what the author of the original document meant, in particular since you do not show it...), and that is the opposite bit order. That is instead of 0x80 you enter 0x01, instead of 0x1A you enter 58 etc.

ProntoEdit does not acknowledge NEC1 protocol

Actually, it does accept NEC1, as "short form pronto". Your first one is

900A 006C 0000 0001 8077 1AE5

I leave the other ones as exercise for the reader...
Post 5 made on Thursday July 11, 2019 at 07:36
buzz
Super Member
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May 2003
3,179
Note that the 3rd code ... er ... does not add up. perhaps it should be 0x 807F A659.


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