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Post 1 made on Thursday May 16, 2019 at 14:41
srmd
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Hello,

I am the Maintenance Director in a Long Term Care Facility and we are having a HUGE problem in our resident rooms.
As you may have already guessed, either both remotes control both TV's... or one remote controls both TV's.
Our cable supplier, Spectrum, recently 'upgraded' the network to carry HD. Which meant we had to now have all DTA's in our rooms with a 'universal remote.'
In several rooms (upwards of 30 different rooms) we are having this issue.
I have this issue in several rooms whether the TV brands are different or not.
I do understand that in some cases TV codes overlap because of the RF issue within the programming. It's my understanding that the federal govt. maintains these codes and that only 'so many' (only 16?) codes have been released into the general public for civilian use. So, RCA might put code *1234 on every 5th TV made, and LG might put code *1234 on every 10th TV made. Is this correct?
I'm having this issue in so many rooms that swapping TV's with new ones would be cost prohibitive (and could potentially still have the same effect) if the latter is true. Also, trying to figure out what remotes work with what brand is going to be mind-blowingly time consuming and tedious.
Is there any other way to correct this issue? Adding in another piece of equipment and/or something aesthetically pleasing to the remote itself to quelch this problem? I've read where some people had used some sort of peel and stick label over the remote sensor to weaken the RF signal enough that it didn't effect the other TV in close proximity. However, the down side to doing that, is that you would have to be VERY direct with the TV you wanted to actually control, and make sure that it is pointed directly at the TV sensor etc. I fear doing this would only add to my numerous maintenance calls in the run of a day with "remotes that don't work."
Any help at all would be greatly appreciated! Thank you all so much!
Shawn
Post 2 made on Thursday May 16, 2019 at 15:07
burtont62
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The TV codes sent by the remotes are IR not RF, even if the cable boxes are RF.
Post 3 made on Thursday May 16, 2019 at 16:06
edmund
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Newer tv's can be controlled via RF from tv oem remotes, like the Roku tvs. It is a good chance some of the TV's are roku tv's already, just that the supplied oem remotes are IR, but can be switched for RF one. Once RF remote is paired with a roku tv it controls everything on the tv by RF including Volume and Mute.
Post 4 made on Thursday May 16, 2019 at 16:06
Mac Burks (39)
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Sounds to me like you have rooms with 2 people in them...so 2 TVs each having its own cable box and universal remote.

I assume that the cable box remotes control the cable boxes via RF and the TVs via IR coming out of the remote or IR coming out of the cable box.

NOTE: Most TVs do not have RF communication capabilities so your universal remote cant control it over RF.

Maybe you are saying that the RF remotes are overlapping and cross talking? I have never seen this before even in large buildings with hundreds of people using cable box universal remotes.

Questions:

1. When you say "either both remotes control both TV's... or one remote controls both TV's." are you talking about the TV or the cable box? Are you able to use either remote to turn both TVs on and off and adjust volume? Or are you saying that you can change the channel on both cable boxes with either remote?

2. What model cable box and remote? I want to see if the remote can be set to IR only. If so you could try IR repeater systems with IR shields.

3. What is the room layout? Can you sketch a typical room out so i can see whether or not this will work. For example... if the 2 TVs are on the same wall close to each other then both remotes will most likely "hit" both IR receivers making the IR repeater system a waste of time.
Avid Stamp Collector - I really love 39 Cent Stamps
Post 5 made on Thursday May 16, 2019 at 19:16
davidcasemore
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There's a lot to unpack here.

The Federal Government has no say on your particular problem. They do regulate the frequencies which can be used for consumer products, and these devices must comply with FCC rules as to not cause interference on other equipment. (they don't define "interference" as something controlling more than one TV - they just want to make sure the policeman or fireman can talk on their radios and that airplanes don't fall out of the sky).

That being said, some set-top boxes have a couple of code sets available to avoid this issue. You would need to study the owner's manual.

The other thing you need to know is how are these remotes communicating?

1. They could be IR which requires you to point the remote at the equipment. Sometimes this blast of infrared light can bounce off of walls and send the command to another piece of equipment but it's most likely to happen if the equipment is visible from one spot.

2. They could be RF which doesn't need to be pointed at anything and could control equipment in several rooms that are near enough to receive the signal. These are the remotes that would be more likely to have more than one code set available.

If you can't change the remote code set, or if the remotes use IR, your next step would be to install an IR Routing System (Google it) which would be much less expensive than new TVs and set-top boxes.

Other people on this forum could be of more help if you were to provide model numbers for the TVs and for the set-top boxes.
Post 6 made on Thursday May 16, 2019 at 23:04
Ernie Gilman
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On May 16, 2019 at 19:16, davidcasemore said...
There's a lot to unpack here.

2. They could be RF which doesn't need to be pointed at anything and could control equipment in several rooms that are near enough to receive the signal. These are the remotes that would be more likely to have more than one code set available.

A client/friend in Arizona has a ranch where one of the buildings is called The Hotel. There are four bedrooms upstairs there. They have twin/king RF-controlled mattresses, two per room, four rooms... and there are a total of 6 RF frequencies.

It has happened that a person raises their bed in the middle of the night, awakening a person in another room, who then lowered the mattress.... etc.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. “Bernie” Shaw
Post 7 made on Thursday May 16, 2019 at 23:38
davidcasemore
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On May 16, 2019 at 23:04, Ernie Gilman said...
A client/friend in Arizona has a ranch where one of the buildings is called The Hotel. There are four bedrooms upstairs there. They have twin/king RF-controlled mattresses, two per room, four rooms... and there are a total of 6 RF frequencies.

It has happened that a person raises their bed in the middle of the night, awakening a person in another room, who then lowered the mattress.... etc.

I have seen this with ceiling paddle fans too.
Post 8 made on Friday May 17, 2019 at 02:07
edmund
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If some of the residents tv are Roku tv's, and you suddenly need a bunch of wifi remotes to prevent controlling each other, see this ebay auction:

[Link: ebay.com]

These are usually furnished Roku sticks, but they will pair to roku tv, only thing its missing is MUTE key. Can't beat the price.
Post 9 made on Friday May 17, 2019 at 07:37
highfigh
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Spectrum has four boxes with their name and some older 'legacy' products in the field. What this place needs is two brands of TVs in each double room and the Spectrum 110 cable box. The remote can be paired via RF to the box  and then, the remote will be set up to control the TV. CEC is involved- after pairing the remote and going to the TV control section, the screen asks if the brand of TV is correct, so it's detecting it through the HDMI cable.

With two TVs, there's less chance of one remote controlling the wrong TV, although someone needs to make sure the code sets don't intersect. As long as the cable boxes are paired correctly, they can't change the channel for the other TV. This remote is different from the old one with device buttons across the top-


My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."
Post 10 made on Friday May 17, 2019 at 07:39
highfigh
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On May 17, 2019 at 02:07, edmund said...
If some of the residents tv are Roku tv's, and you suddenly need a bunch of wifi remotes to prevent controlling each other, see this ebay auction:

[Link: ebay.com]

These are usually furnished Roku sticks, but they will pair to roku tv, only thing its missing is MUTE key. Can't beat the price.

I don't see a way to get older people to not hate the Spectrum app on a Roku TV. IT SUCKS and it doesn't have numbered buttons for channel entry.
My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."


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