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OT: Stuck Water Pump
This thread has 18 replies. Displaying posts 1 through 15.
Post 1 made on Friday April 12, 2019 at 14:25
goldenzrule
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Anyone have some tricks for getting a really stubborn water pump off the block? All bolts are removed, it's just sealed tight. I tried a mallot, a 2x4/mallot combo, a torched it a little. I can't find my PB Blaster but the plan is to soak it for a bit. Other then finding a good pry point and put some pressure while hitting it, I'm not sure what else to try to get it off.
Post 2 made on Friday April 12, 2019 at 14:44
ceied
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BFH is your friend. what kind of motor? if its aluminum use a big pry bar
Ed will be known as the Tiger Woods of the integration business, followed closely with the renaming of his company to "Hotties A/V". The tag line will be "We like big racks and tight holes"...
OP | Post 3 made on Friday April 12, 2019 at 14:53
goldenzrule
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On April 12, 2019 at 14:44, ceied said...
BFH is your friend. what kind of motor? if its aluminum use a big pry bar

Yeah, is a 5.7l Hemi
Post 4 made on Friday April 12, 2019 at 14:53
Ernie Gilman
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There are various chemicals that are supposed to infiltrate, penetrate, or whatever different pieces of whatever that are stuck together.

The first thing I'd do, really, is to look at the materials and check via google for hints. Is it cast aluminum? Cast iron? Is the pump made of the same material as the block? I can't offer any hints tailored to these particular materials except for you to take note of the materials and look up what you can.

Case in point: decades ago I was asked if, since I was such a smartass, I could figure out how to remove a shower head in my girlfriend's parents' house. They wanted a new one. Two plumbers had not been able to remove the old one.

So I thought of "difference in temperature."

I actually got into the shower and turned it on, which the plumbers guaranteed did not do... I did something nuts like turn HOT on full, then put an ice cube up against the nozzle part. Whatever the details, the shower head came off easily with two pairs of pliers.

Also be sure that you really have removed all the bolts. The model you mention (ahem) might have some other thing that holds it in place.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. ďBernieĒ Shaw
OP | Post 5 made on Friday April 12, 2019 at 16:00
goldenzrule
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On April 12, 2019 at 14:53, Ernie Gilman said...
There are various chemicals that are supposed to infiltrate, penetrate, or whatever different pieces of whatever that are stuck together.

The first thing I'd do, really, is to look at the materials and check via google for hints. Is it cast aluminum? Cast iron? Is the pump made of the same material as the block? I can't offer any hints tailored to these particular materials except for you to take note of the materials and look up what you can.

Case in point: decades ago I was asked if, since I was such a smartass, I could figure out how to remove a shower head in my girlfriend's parents' house. They wanted a new one. Two plumbers had not been able to remove the old one.

So I thought of "difference in temperature."

I actually got into the shower and turned it on, which the plumbers guaranteed did not do... I did something nuts like turn HOT on full, then put an ice cube up against the nozzle part. Whatever the details, the shower head came off easily with two pairs of pliers.

Also be sure that you really have removed all the bolts. The model you mention (ahem) might have some other thing that holds it in place.

The model is 5.7l hemi. All bolts are out. Part of the recommended process is making a template in cardboard with the holes all marked. Did this using the replacement pump. As you remove each bolt, put it in the correct hole in the cardboard. Since they all use different length bolts, and they're scattered about, it's easy to forget which goes where. All of the bolts are in their correct slot on the template.
Post 6 made on Friday April 12, 2019 at 17:21
buzz
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I'm not sure how this would work in practice, but a gear puller might help.

Ernie's temperature shock approach might work, if you could cool only the pump. Dry ice might be useful, but I would avoid shocking the block with dry ice.

Is there a gasket between the pump and the block? If so, you might be able to put the assembly under tension and add some solvent at the edges, breaking down the gasket. This would probably not be an instant technique. You would need constant tension and renewal of the solvent periodically.
Post 7 made on Friday April 12, 2019 at 17:31
Ernie Gilman
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I take it there's no recommended process for actually separating the two things.

That bolt scenario must have been REALLY confusing before they figured out how to ensure success. Hopefully a wise engineer figured it out before they ever hit the market.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. ďBernieĒ Shaw
Post 8 made on Friday April 12, 2019 at 17:44
buzz
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If you can, drive a wedge between the block and pump, don't try to blast the pump off the block, just apply some tension to the gasket -- and wait. I use a similar technique when separating plastic things held together with adhesive. It may take some hours before the adhesive breaks down. The trick with the plastic pieces is to apply enough force to irritate the adhesive, but not damage the plastic.
Post 9 made on Friday April 12, 2019 at 18:02
SWFLMike
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Put the belt back on and fire it up. I'll bet it'll be off before you finish your beer. :)
Post 10 made on Friday April 12, 2019 at 18:03
King of typos
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Grab a ratchet strap. Wrap the water pump and then wrap an other piece on the car. Or something else outside that is solid. Then just ratchet the pump off.

You on can try various different ways. Either straight off or side to side, it may require back one way then an other way.

As as for the dry ice method. You could always start the engine and let it warm up, maybe 3 to 5 minutes. Just donít let it over heat. Doing this shall not harm the engine. I mean think about it, the thermostat is closed during cold starts, especially in the winter. Thus the water isnít flowing anyways. After warming the engine up, apply the dry ice to the pump. Heck try to ratchet strap too.

KOT
Post 11 made on Friday April 12, 2019 at 20:14
Fins
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Buy a new truck

Question, do they spray brine on the roads up there in the winter instead of salt? Iíve seen that shit corrode brake rotors to the point that on a vehicle with 20,000 miles they were so destroyed they couldnít be turned, and they were fused to the hub. Just wondering if itís the same issue if the road spray got to the water pump.
Civil War reenactment is LARPing for people with no imagination.

OP | Post 12 made on Friday April 12, 2019 at 20:59
goldenzrule
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On April 12, 2019 at 20:14, Fins said...
Buy a new truck

Question, do they spray brine on the roads up there in the winter instead of salt? Iíve seen that shit corrode brake rotors to the point that on a vehicle with 20,000 miles they were so destroyed they couldnít be turned, and they were fused to the hub. Just wondering if itís the same issue if the road spray got to the water pump.

I finally got it off. Some liberal use of PB Blaster and lots and smacking it with a hammer. Funny thing is there was almost nothing to clean off the block afterwards.They do spray that shit on the highways, and I think some town. The issue here is it's a high mile truck that I got pretty cheap and the previous owner did not take care of it the way I thought he did. So I am going through fixing stuff. The pump was likely on there for years. The reason for changing was really due to noise with the fan clutch. I figured if I'm gonna change that, I may as well do the water pump too. Found a seized idler pulley while I was in there so replaced the pullies too.
Post 13 made on Friday April 12, 2019 at 23:11
Ernie Gilman
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On April 12, 2019 at 20:59, goldenzrule said...
The reason for changing was really due to noise with the fan clutch. I figured if I'm gonna change that, I may as well do the water pump too. Found a seized idler pulley while I was in there so replaced the pulleys too.

Yup.
Wisdom right there.
If it takes fourteen bolt removals to replace the pump, it probably takes twelve (ish) to change the belt. You've been wise to replace the pump along with the other thing.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. ďBernieĒ Shaw
Post 14 made on Sunday April 14, 2019 at 15:21
Glackowitz
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I just pulled one of our cars in to replace a water pump, we have owned the car for about 11 years and think itís still the original pump. Bought the car with 65,000 miles on it and now at 208,xxx.
Need to get the fan clutch and fan off first. Itís a 36mm nut with about 1/2Ē of clearance to get to it. My largest crescent was to thick, might be a call to OíReillys or autozone for a loaner tool.
There's no worse feeling than that millisecond you're sure you are going to die after leaning your chair back a little too far.
OP | Post 15 made on Sunday April 14, 2019 at 17:32
goldenzrule
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On April 14, 2019 at 15:21, Glackowitz said...
I just pulled one of our cars in to replace a water pump, we have owned the car for about 11 years and think itís still the original pump. Bought the car with 65,000 miles on it and now at 208,xxx.
Need to get the fan clutch and fan off first. Itís a 36mm nut with about 1/2Ē of clearance to get to it. My largest crescent was to thick, might be a call to OíReillys or autozone for a loaner tool.

What kind of car?  Most people say to remove the fan clutch on my truck before the shroud covering fan.  I found it easier to remove the shroud first which opened up the clearance.  The fan clutch was stuck also, could not break it free.  I ended up torching it for a minute and it came right off. I did have to make a tool to hold the pulley in place on the water pump.  I just grabbed some square iron bar with holes predrilled at home depot and some long bolts and nuts.  the bolts just slide into the holes in the pulley and let the bar rest against the frame and it holds it still while you hammer at the wrench to break the nut free.
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