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Topic:
Unbalanced/Balanced Inputs on Mixers
This thread has 24 replies. Displaying posts 16 through 25.
Post 16 made on Friday March 15, 2019 at 16:06
Ernie Gilman
Yes, That Ernie!
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Fred,
Two things jumped out at me about the new QSC amps.

First, it's GREAT to have indicator lights on the back. Every time you're troubleshooting, you have to look at the connections while verifying that there's signal. With this QSC feature you can do it by yourself or without having to jump around!

But there's another thing that needs to be clarified.

The amplifier pairs are rated at 200 watts each, so you can get an 8 x 200 amplifier in a single rack unit space.

The average person will think that the 8 channel amp can output 1600 watts. But can it?
What makes the QSC MP-A series amplifiers noteworthy are several things. First, you can have channel 1 operate at 70 (or 100) volt and channel 2 operate at a low (4 or 8 ohm) impedance level. That’s noteworthy, but not completely unique. The second feature, dubbed FlexAmp technology allows the installer to allocate resources as required.

Very cool. I notice you're talking about channels 1 and 2, not all 8.
Essentially, take the pair of amplifier channels, (2 at 200 watts) and divide as needed. I can configure channel 1 to output 60 watts at 70 volts and channel 2 at 340 watts at the low impedance setting. It makes it really easy to designate the amount of power a zone or subsection of a zone receives. With 8 channels, I have four pairs of amplifiers available to manipulate, with all being different or all being the same.

Also pretty clear. You're now talking about 8 channels.
As long as the total power is 400 watts, you can manipulate as the job requires.

But I just realized that I might have totally misunderstood this.

I first thought uh-oh, we DO NOT have 1600 watts in one chassis, as the first paragraph seems to imply. The "total power" can only be 400 watts. But maybe you're talking 400 watts PER two-channel amp, so maybe the entire unit might be capable of 1600 watts.

Then again, you might have written it perfectly clearly but a copy editor might have messed it up to save a half inch of column space.

Could you clarify this?
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. “Bernie” Shaw
Post 17 made on Friday March 15, 2019 at 16:41
Fred Harding
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per two channel, 400 watts total available, you divide as you see fit.
On the West Coast of Wisconsin
Post 18 made on Friday March 15, 2019 at 16:46
highfigh
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On March 15, 2019 at 13:35, Ernie Gilman said...
Fred,
this has been true with every iPhone I've ever run across, and you can't say those are "inexpensive devices."

Besides, I didn't overtly assign blame. I just said that's how it is. I point out that players are different from "standard consumer" levels, so if anything, I blame the players.

When the larger charging port was used, a cable was available that connected there and sent audio via a 3.5mm plug and the level was a lot closer to that of a normal source.

To be honest, I would use the BT receiver I installed at the school gym before I would use the output from the ear plug jack. It's not worth screwing around. If someone really wants to get all of this, the Denon Pro piece is a BT receiver with XLR out.

Available at Fred's favorite distributor.
My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."
Post 19 made on Friday March 15, 2019 at 16:49
highfigh
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On March 15, 2019 at 14:38, Fred Harding said...
Brian, indeed they do. If you'd like more info on that piece, here's an article some guy wrote on that series... [Link: cepro.com]

Great. Bring that guy into it, now.
My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."
Post 20 made on Friday March 15, 2019 at 16:53
Fred Harding
Super Member
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done.
On the West Coast of Wisconsin
Post 21 made on Monday March 18, 2019 at 08:40
Mr. Brad
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Excuse my ignorance in asking this--it's out of my own curiosity. I've noticed that on mixers there a few unbalanced inputs and many balanced inputs. If one has many sources with unbalanced outputs, what is the best way to connect them to a mixer?

If the mixer has unbalanced inputs and stated above, you just connect to those inputs. The mixer has the electronics to handle the signal. No reason to put more electronics in front of the mixers circuits.
Post 22 made on Monday March 18, 2019 at 09:47
highfigh
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On March 18, 2019 at 08:40, Mr. Brad said...
If the mixer has unbalanced inputs and stated above, you just connect to those inputs. The mixer has the electronics to handle the signal. No reason to put more electronics in front of the mixers circuits.

Impedance matching and using the correct signal levels are very important. If the impedance is mis-matched, it can cause problems with noise, frequency response, signal level and more. This stuff isn't made to mix & match, randomly.
My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."
Post 23 made on Monday March 18, 2019 at 12:28
Brad Humphrey
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On March 18, 2019 at 09:47, highfigh said...
Impedance matching and using the correct signal levels are very important. If the impedance is mis-matched, it can cause problems with noise, frequency response, signal level and more. This stuff isn't made to mix & match, randomly.

Which means you completely skipped over my post. MANY pro mixers HAVE that feature built in. They will PROPERLY accept the input of balanced or unbalanced signals. There is a physical setting that takes place for each input, that allows it to accept both.
Again, many pro mixers have this feature. Just not all of them.
Post 24 made on Monday March 18, 2019 at 13:09
highfigh
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On March 18, 2019 at 12:28, Brad Humphrey said...
Which means you completely skipped over my post. MANY pro mixers HAVE that feature built in. They will PROPERLY accept the input of balanced or unbalanced signals. There is a physical setting that takes place for each input, that allows it to accept both.
Again, many pro mixers have this feature. Just not all of them.

You didn't write anything about PRO mixers.
My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."
Post 25 made on Monday March 18, 2019 at 14:59
Brad Humphrey
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I specifically linked to some and talked about them, in my post. I did not use the word 'Pro' in that post but many of these products don't either.
Also the original poster mentioned brand & model that fits this description.
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