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Topic:
Could a ceiling/pole mount be used "upside down" on a cabinet top?
This thread has 26 replies. Displaying posts 16 through 27.
Post 16 made on Sunday February 25, 2018 at 22:09
FreddyFreeloader
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I do this all the time. Couple of 2x4s at the right depth either horizontal or vertical and stud/joist hangers and then just a regular flat mount.
OP | Post 17 made on Monday February 26, 2018 at 10:33
tomciara
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I have put false backs in before also.

Here, the doors that open and slide back into the sides of the cabinet make side-constructed stuff not possible.

The large open space at the top, which formerly accommodated a projection TV, makes a top to bottom strut extremely visible.

I'm ordering a ceiling mount. It comes with a 36" extension, so I also ordered 6" and 12" extensions, along with a couple adjustable extensions, hoping to get the height I am after.

Stay tuned.
"Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing ever happened." - Winston Churchill
Post 18 made on Friday March 2, 2018 at 13:33
Greg C
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I have done it on an outside install mounted to a Teak cabinet. Was able to rotate it to angle the view the client wanted.

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Post 19 made on Saturday March 3, 2018 at 10:18
FreddyFreeloader
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On February 26, 2018 at 10:33, tomciara said...
I have put false backs in before also.

Here, the doors that open and slide back into the sides of the cabinet make side-constructed stuff not possible.

The large open space at the top, which formerly accommodated a projection TV, makes a top to bottom strut extremely visible.

I'm ordering a ceiling mount. It comes with a 36" extension, so I also ordered 6" and 12" extensions, along with a couple adjustable extensions, hoping to get the height I am after.

Stay tuned.

Gotcha. An aftermarket tabletop stand with adjustable also height comes to mind. Maybe you have a plan but I’m wondering if an upside ceiling mount will want to stay straight with such a small base plus the fact that normally it counts on gravity to stay straight.
Post 20 made on Saturday March 3, 2018 at 13:04
Ernie Gilman
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On February 24, 2018 at 12:11, cma said...
I don't see why not

Here's why not:
On February 24, 2018 at 12:18, Ernie Gilman said...
A ceiling mount tends to hang plumb because the weight is more or less centered under the pipe. An upside down application will be the reverse. The TV will tend to want to fall off to the side because it's above the mounting point. Your challenge is to stabilize things so that doesn't happen.

The problem is called a lateral load. It's hard to find much about this kind of load short of huge sideways forces on buildings, but look it up and think about the forces that are shown.

As an example, if your TV is off perfect balance such that, say, five pounds of sideways force is exerted against the mount at, say, 18 inches up; and if the base is 4 inches across; the lever thus formed translates that into an upward pulling force on the mounting bolts of 5 pounds times 18 inches divided by 4 inches, which is 22 1/2 pounds. Now that I've done a calculation that probably puts us in the ballpark, it doesn't look like much force. Just be aware of it and make the mount plenty beefy.

On February 24, 2018 at 19:10, Archibald "Harry" Tuttle said...
Tried that upside down ceiling mount before, but gravity didn't cooperate.

On February 25, 2018 at 00:26, AZCS said...
How about something like...
[Link: chiefmfg.com]

Yes! The base on that is not very large, but if the TV's mass is pretty well centered above it, the base should keep the TV from falling or angling to the side. If it's possible to use lag bolts, DO NOT do so! Use nuts and bolts, with fender washers on the bottom so that pullout forces can't make the nuts sink into the wood.

On February 26, 2018 at 10:33, tomciara said...
I'm ordering a ceiling mount. It comes with a 36" extension, so I also ordered 6" and 12" extensions, along with a couple adjustable extensions, hoping to get the height I am after.

Looking at the numbers I cited above, if the TV exerts a sideways force of 5 pounds at 36 inches up, and the base is 4 inches across, the resulting lever exerts a pullout force of 5 pounds times 36 inches divided by 4 inches, which is 45 pounds.

On March 3, 2018 at 10:18, FreddyFreeloader said...
Gotcha. An aftermarket tabletop stand with adjustable also height comes to mind. Maybe you have a plan but I’m wondering if an upside ceiling mount will want to stay straight with such a small base plus the fact that normally it counts on gravity to stay straight.

In news related to holding a mass up and plumb, take a look at this article: [Link: blogs.dailybreeze.com] about an AM broadcast antenna in the Los Angeles area. It had three or four sets of guy wires that pulled down and out on the antenna, adjusted to hold it totally vertical. Somebody cut ONE TURNBUCKLE on ONE WIRE and the thing "collapsed like an accordion."

You can't just take a hanging TV mount and turn it upside down.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. “Bernie” Shaw
Post 21 made on Saturday March 3, 2018 at 19:12
lippavisual
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[Link: milestone.com]

You could always get creative with this. Some mounting flanges for top and bottom or side to side, couple pieces of sprinkler pipe, couplers, etc. Plenty of durability.

Easy peasy.
Post 22 made on Saturday March 3, 2018 at 20:47
Ernie Gilman
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On March 3, 2018 at 19:12, lippavisual said...

I've stressed over and over that you can't just turn a hanging mount into a column-type mount (supported from below). Check out this detail from the most recently suggested model, found at [Link: milestone.com]"

Three Tilt Adjustment Options on TPM and TPP: +/- 15 º tilt on gravity centered axis point,

IT SAID "GRAVITY CENTERED AXIS POINT" AND THAT'S FOR HANGING, where gravity is totally working in your favor. How difficult, then, would it be to take this mount and overcome the effects of gravity when you're fighting them? For what you want to do, gravity is not your friend, though it's the ceiling mount's friend.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. “Bernie” Shaw
Post 23 made on Sunday March 4, 2018 at 09:40
lippavisual
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Ernie that’s why I said use a top and bottom flange. Never once did I say or suggest to use a ceiling mount upside down. Gravity will be held at bay.

Clearly you don’t have much experience installing TVs other than on a wall mount bracket.
OP | Post 24 made on Sunday March 4, 2018 at 11:20
tomciara
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I can't picture a 55" TV that can almost be carried with one hand yank lag bolts out of a 3/4" solid cherry panel, when the mounting plate will barely be 20" above the flange??
"Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing ever happened." - Winston Churchill
Post 25 made on Sunday March 4, 2018 at 21:07
Ernie Gilman
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We all think we understand the forces we'll run into, and their magnitudes.

Just be SURE. I didn't find it hard to get actual specs on bolt pullout and such. Instead of boring you with the math, here are videos of some guys who were pretty sure that their equipment was going to do exactly what was needed.

[Link: youtube.com]

[Link: youtube.com]

Last edited by Ernie Gilman on March 5, 2018 00:31.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. “Bernie” Shaw
Post 26 made on Monday March 5, 2018 at 20:00
Neurorad
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I'd assemble a 2x4 frame and solid base to hold an articulating mount. Bolt the assembly to the bottom and back of the cabinet. Bring the TV to the front.

You could add a lightweight fascia frame to the front to hide the gaps, attached with magnets.
TB A+ Partner
Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense. -Buddha
OP | Post 27 made on Tuesday March 6, 2018 at 21:04
tomciara
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Re-reading this thread, I did find a wealth of information here, and thank you to everybody who contributed.

Something in me says that whatever forces exist when you hang a television from the ceiling, the exact inverse forces will exist when you turn the pole upside down.

Next Tuesday I will find out!
"Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing ever happened." - Winston Churchill
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