Your Universal Remote Control Center
RemoteCentral.com
Custom Installers' Lounge Forum - View Post
Previous section Next section Up level
Up level
The following page was printed from RemoteCentral.com:

Login:
Pass:
 
 

Topic:
Camera system design.
This thread has 6 replies. Displaying all posts.
Post 1 made on Wednesday January 3, 2018 at 15:44
FreddyFreeloader
Super Member
Joined:
Posts:
April 2004
3,095
Iím getting more and more calls for camera systems in large homes and corporate environments. Aside from discussing coverage priorities like ingress/egress areas and taking a walk around the building I really donít have any kind of mechanism in place for deciding exactly where to put cameras and what to cover. I do however always feel like the client is expecting me to tell them this.

What is the best way to go about getting clients to think critically about their own environment and learning what someoneís coverage priorities really are without sounding like it is ME that doesnít know where to start. I mean if they said here do it the way you think it should be done it would be different. Problem is they want to be a part of it I just donít know how to let them.

I guess the same question applies for designing any kind of system, theater room, etc.
Post 2 made on Wednesday January 3, 2018 at 16:41
Mario
Loyal Member
Joined:
Posts:
November 2006
5,539
If you're in major market, contact one of the MFG or major distributor.
Most will be happy to take an hour or 2 to sit down and discuss good design practices.
Other than that, experience will teach you.
Walk into WalMart and look. Actually, before you ever get inside, check out the number of cameras they have on poles, walls and every corner. Drive to the back.

Hollywood (CSI, NCIS, etc.) has taught us that 1 ATM camera can somehow see around the corners and image can be 'enhanced' to see person's fingerprint from 300 yards away.

Don't put cameras pointing straight down or all you'll be able to tell is person's bold spot.
You'll need 2x or 3x as many cameras as you think.
Don't just install one 2.8mm camera and think that just because it has nearly 90deg FOV that you'll be able to make out who's at the door 30 feet away.

There is more, so much more...
Post 3 made on Wednesday January 3, 2018 at 16:46
PatMac
Regular Member
Joined:
Posts:
February 2014
209
I don't do residential camera installations (long story). However, when I perform retail camera installations, I try to think like a criminal when planning. For some, that's easier to do than others, but I watch a lot of cop shows ;-). I try to put myself in the perpetrator's shoes...and where they would have to pass before doing their deed. I focus on getting the best facial recognition shot I can...preferably with a light source behind the camera. Another primary goal is to get the best shot of a license plate, but that can be next to impossible.
When in doubt, run plenty of spare cable in case the camera needs to be moved in the future.
Every structure will have it's own challenges and easy calls. That's what makes it fun.
Post 4 made on Wednesday January 3, 2018 at 16:53
highfigh
Loyal Member
Joined:
Posts:
September 2004
6,214
If the budget allows, try to make sure that each camera can see at least one other camera- that way, you'll have video if someone tries to disable cameras.

Make sure you can see ALL routs in and out of the building, all paths to the building from the lot's perimeter and if possible, put cameras in the building's entrances.

Are you going to try for license plate recognition? Those are expensive, but they work. Also, if the place is really worth protecting and the odds of problems is high, think about using a thermal imaging camera where people may hide.
My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."
Post 5 made on Wednesday January 3, 2018 at 21:09
Ernie Gilman
Yes, That Ernie!
Joined:
Posts:
December 2001
27,796
Most of the cameras I've worked with over the last several years have LOTS of settings, but no explanation anywhere of just what the settings do. I'd love to see that and you will, too. Somehow the Chinese manufacturers think three-letter abbreviations will tell us everything. Of course, they may not know what these things mean!

If you have to cover an area that has you pointing toward the sun for part of the day, be sure the client knows that that view at that time won't be worth much -- the brightness of the sun darkens everything between you and the sun -- so he'll need a camera looking the other way.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. ďBernieĒ Shaw
Post 6 made on Thursday January 4, 2018 at 17:22
Junior Member
Joined:
Posts:
November 2017
23
On January 3, 2018 at 15:44, FreddyFreeloader said...
Iím getting more and more calls for camera systems in large homes and corporate environments. Aside from discussing coverage priorities like ingress/egress areas and taking a walk around the building I really donít have any kind of mechanism in place for deciding exactly where to put cameras and what to cover. I do however always feel like the client is expecting me to tell them this.

What is the best way to go about getting clients to think critically about their own environment and learning what someoneís coverage priorities really are without sounding like it is ME that doesnít know where to start. I mean if they said here do it the way you think it should be done it would be different. Problem is they want to be a part of it I just donít know how to let them.

I guess the same question applies for designing any kind of system, theater room, etc.

I agree those can definitely be some challenging conversations to have. In the discussion I always like to use a sort of survey method. Don't ask them specifically where they are looking to put cameras but what are they trying to accomplish. You might get answers like we want to make sure people are not entering this specific room, or we want to make sure we see everyone that comes on to our property etc. Ask what kind of quality they are looking for as well.

These are just a couple of questions you can ask early on in the process. There can be so many more which is why we have being doing what we can to help you as installers get through this process.

With our Visualint Surveillance category we take a lot of that work and do it for you including full system design and configuration. We do this with our Virtual Technician program. You get the initial questions answered from the client and then fill out our form and give it to us. From there we design the job for you. Once you recieve the system and go out to the job site you give our VT team a call and they will take you through the rest of the setup and configuration.

Let me know if you want to discuss it more.
SnapAV Technical Trainer
Post 7 made on Thursday January 4, 2018 at 20:22
Ernie Gilman
Yes, That Ernie!
Joined:
Posts:
December 2001
27,796
Derek,
that's a great offer! It still depends on us, for instance, seeing when we're there at 10 AM that the sun will be right behind the person you want to see at 4PM. I recently gave an added camera to a church and I had planned to put it right above an entry door. Only after thinking about it a dozen times did it hit me that in the winter, the sun would shine on the camera from about 2:30 on. I moved it up 18" and now you can see some bald spot, but you can see the person, too!

For commercial installations, remember that you're not always trying to protect against customers cheating or stealing; registers need to be watched and slippery floors in the kitchen need to be watched so that if someone slips and falls, you'll have an idea how and why.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. ďBernieĒ Shaw


Jump to


Protected Feature Before you can reply to a message...
You must first register for a Remote Central user account - it's fast and free! Or, if you already have an account, please login now.

Please read the following: Unsolicited commercial advertisements are absolutely not permitted on this forum. Other private buy & sell messages should be posted to our Marketplace. For information on how to advertise your service or product click here. Remote Central reserves the right to remove or modify any post that is deemed inappropriate.

Hosting Services by ipHouse