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Topic:
Distributor continually selling repacked product
This thread has 20 replies. Displaying posts 16 through 21.
Post 16 made on Thursday December 7, 2017 at 13:01
Ernie Gilman
Yes, That Ernie!
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On December 6, 2017 at 16:02, Brad Humphrey said...
If you get a box that is missing ANYTHING that originally came with it; that is obviously unacceptable!
If you get product that does not look brand new in anyway (scratches, dirt, scuffs, etc.); also unacceptable.
If you get a product that has been clearly sold before (was officially registered, which would affect warranty & claims); unacceptable.

All three of those things should cause an immediate big-ass loud complaint because all three of those things will be noticed when on site, miles and hours from the distributor, and will often necessitate an additional day to be spent to complete the installation.

It sounds like you have been getting a lot of the latter. I would have a heated conversation about new vs. used with the distributor.

Heated conversation. On the sales floor. Yeah. That's the words I was trying to think of.

If they want to offer discounts on the 'used' equipment they have, great.

Which also means I'll never "discover" it in the client's home.

This entire issue is why I'm so against recommendations I've heard here that before we take, say... a Denon receiver to a client's home, we should open it in the shop and take an hour to update the firmware.

This does two things: it requires that we deliver open cartons to the client's home, and it hides work hat the receiver requires, making it hard or impossible to charge for.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. “Bernie” Shaw
Post 17 made on Thursday December 7, 2017 at 17:43
Brad Humphrey
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On December 7, 2017 at 13:01, Ernie Gilman said...
This does two things: it requires that we deliver open cartons to the client's home, and it hides work that the receiver requires, making it hard or impossible to charge for.

​Dealer Destination Fee
:)
Post 18 made on Friday December 8, 2017 at 07:36
highfigh
Loyal Member
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On December 6, 2017 at 11:38, Ernie Gilman said...
You know, I'd say exactly the same thing. But where is it written that something, once opened, must be labeled and sold as not new?

I'm not saying it's not a law somewhere, I'm actually asking where the law is written down. For instance, I know that electronics must be UL approved to be sold in Los Angeles County. It's a county requirement.

State laws cover this- look in the Consumer Protection area on your state's site. Federal, too- you should know this.

UL lists products after testing as having passed, they don't approve. If they did, they would be liable in the event that something fails.

There's a lot that we, as integrators who sell products should know, but often don't. I don't know about CA, but in Wisconsin, anything sold off-site (not at the main place of business) has a three day window for returns, so it's not a case of "All Sales Final" when we sell something at their home, business or if we hold a sale in any place other than a fixed location. Since we don't always have a retail location, this means three days, no whining if they don't like it and that means we need to be careful about making sure we communicate well with the buyer.

Another thing we have in our favor, as businesses that sign a dealer agreement, is the statute that prevents manufacturers from pulling a line on a whim, just because they may have a friend who has opened a business and they want to do a favor. It's good for dealers who are doing a good job with the products, but bad for the manufacturer whose dealer may be a complete turd- they can't be cut off, either. However, the manufacturer is free to add a dealer close to the one they want to cut off, but they need to watch out for the territory boundaries, if that applies.
My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."
Post 19 made on Friday December 8, 2017 at 07:40
highfigh
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On December 7, 2017 at 13:01, Ernie Gilman said...
All three of those things should cause an immediate big-ass loud complaint because all three of those things will be noticed when on site, miles and hours from the distributor, and will often necessitate an additional day to be spent to complete the installation.

Heated conversation. On the sales floor. Yeah. That's the words I was trying to think of.

Which also means I'll never "discover" it in the client's home.

This entire issue is why I'm so against recommendations I've heard here that before we take, say... a Denon receiver to a client's home, we should open it in the shop and take an hour to update the firmware.

This does two things: it requires that we deliver open cartons to the client's home, and it hides work hat the receiver requires, making it hard or impossible to charge for.

What if the piece has an immediate problem? Would you rather find out at your place, or at the client's home? The contractors who set up their systems at the shop to make sure everything works as programmed/designed call this 'staging' and I would suggest we do this when failures have become a problem but I would also recommend explaining that we do this to the client.

Any time spent doing setup on a piece of equipment should be billed to that job- why does it matter where the firmware was updated? It's part of the installation- why would you NOT bill for it?

Hides work? Show them where it states in the manual that the firmware should be updated. Sounds like you're afraid to charge for your work. Dealing with sellers who discount more than you and hook customers on price is a PITA, but it's OUR job to sell ourselves as better than the low price leaders.

How many cars aren't road-tested before delivery? Does that make them 'used'? No, of course not. That only applies to post-sale status.
My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."
Post 20 made on Friday December 8, 2017 at 16:40
dunnersfella
Regular Member
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October 2016
137
I'm a huge fan of building the rack at home base, updating the kit and testing to ensure it works on-site.
Communication with the customer about your process is a simple way to ensure your customer doesn't believe they're getting second-hand equipment.

If you're facing issues with customers about this, take a look at how your process is being communicated, sort that and it's super streamlined and reduces the risk of stuff-ups on-site dramatically.
This industry is not getting cheaper and cheaper, we're simply convincing ourselves they we have to push the cheapest option to customers.
Post 21 made on Saturday December 9, 2017 at 02:15
ErikU
Regular Member
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January 2015
103
Yes, call the owner.

It's possible they are not aware and need to know, or it's possible they just don't care, but should. Either way, call them, find out whats up, and give them a chance to make it right if they offer. If not, make it clear you will be moving your business elsewhere and why.
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