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Topic:
Reliable wireless bridge
This thread has 18 replies. Displaying posts 16 through 19.
Post 16 made on Thursday November 9, 2017 at 08:56
buzz
Select Member
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May 2003
2,314
On November 9, 2017 at 00:59, Impaqt said...
haven't had any need to do a mesh setup for wifi at all yet. I dont quite understand the appeal for a home.

A typical consumer "repeater" has only one set of radios and can't multi-task. It receives a packet, flips to transmit mode, then broadcasts that packet. By design, this will cut speed in half -- each time that a packet traverses a repeater. Mesh access points can simultaneously send and receive. The mesh attempts to find a minimum time path through the mesh. Traversing a mesh node implies a slight latency, not a wait for the whole packet to arrive before sending delay. If a node goes down, the mesh will work out a new topology.

The appeal is that one does not need to run wires and a wireless mesh will minimize the performance hit compared to the "repeater" approach. Of course, wired is always faster and more robust -- when practical. Mesh is a great solution for renters.

In the real world things are not quite as rosy as implied above: Here are some thoughts

My experience with mesh has been much better than with simple repeaters -- but I will always wire when practical. While I will encounter previously deployed repeater systems, I have only installed one "repeater" (at the customer's insistence because it was already onsite), but I regret that decision because it has caused trouble.

Some of the products will attempt to use dual band to work out a "backbone" scheme. This approach will avoid many of the collisions. and could improve roaming.

Some further food for thought, but note that this review is using the older, not the current Eero product.

Slightly related to the above:

802.11r
Apple devices and roaming
Post 17 made on Thursday November 9, 2017 at 09:44
goldenzrule
Loyal Member
Joined:
Posts:
July 2007
7,169
On November 9, 2017 at 08:56, buzz said...
A typical consumer "repeater" has only one set of radios and can't multi-task. It receives a packet, flips to transmit mode, then broadcasts that packet. By design, this will cut speed in half -- each time that a packet traverses a repeater. Mesh access points can simultaneously send and receive. The mesh attempts to find a minimum time path through the mesh. Traversing a mesh node implies a slight latency, not a wait for the whole packet to arrive before sending delay. If a node goes down, the mesh will work out a new topology.

The appeal is that one does not need to run wires and a wireless mesh will minimize the performance hit compared to the "repeater" approach. Of course, wired is always faster and more robust -- when practical. Mesh is a great solution for renters.

In the real world things are not quite as rosy as implied above: Here are some thoughts

My experience with mesh has been much better than with simple repeaters -- but I will always wire when practical. While I will encounter previously deployed repeater systems, I have only installed one "repeater" (at the customer's insistence because it was already onsite), but I regret that decision because it has caused trouble.

Some of the products will attempt to use dual band to work out a "backbone" scheme. This approach will avoid many of the collisions. and could improve roaming.

Some further food for thought, but note that this review is using the older, not the current Eero product.

Slightly related to the above:

802.11r
Apple devices and roaming

Great post
Post 18 made on Thursday November 9, 2017 at 10:51
Impaqt
RC Moderator
Joined:
Posts:
October 2002
5,517
Thank you for the detail info Buzz. I'm certainly familiar with the benefits of Mesh vs. WDS vs. Repeaters. Regardless, that post is sure to help lots of folks.

I've jsut found that most homes either DO have usable infrastructure or a path to get new wires if need be. worst case scenario I usually run into can be solved with a single wireless bridge. (Or even Moca or Powerline in some cases)
I'm no engineer, but I did stay at a Motel 6 last night!
OP | Post 19 made on Thursday November 9, 2017 at 22:03
dalto
Long Time Member
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Posts:
July 2005
425
On November 9, 2017 at 06:01, Don Heany said...
Thanks folks! dalto- sorry to’ve jacked this, how did you make out with Eero? We’ve done two Pro deployments that worked great...

As a simple to deploy and effective mesh network it worked great in the limited testing I did.

As a wireless bridge to an existing wireless network it worked not at all. It requires a wired eero to use as a gateway so to use it as a bridge on an existing network you need two of them setup in bridge mode. Of course you would end up with a second wireless network in this case.

So I am going to have to keep searching for a reliable wireless bridge.
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