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Camara/ DVR systems for a rental property, any experience?
This thread has 8 replies. Displaying all posts.
Post 1 made on Tuesday September 12, 2017 at 13:19
PSS
Senior Member
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I have a client that want's to install a few cameras (3-5) around a small rental property. Besides the conduit between buildings I need to figure out a few things.
A- The DVR needs to be on a house meter for power AND in a secure, locked location.
B- How can he see the cameras remotely? I suggested he has to get a dedicated internet connection, otherwise he'd have to rely on a tenant (not a good option!). Another option, I can set up a local wifi so he can get close and view without having to get into the DVR.
I also wonder how the tenants will react to having cameras installed on the property? Maybe a feeling of being watched, etc.
So, just wondering if anyone has had a similar installation request and how it worked out.
Post 2 made on Tuesday September 12, 2017 at 13:21
Fred Harding
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Might want to talk to your attorney about this...
On the West Coast of Wisconsin
Post 3 made on Tuesday September 12, 2017 at 13:26
Ernie Gilman
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If I were the tenant, I would totally object to this. No matter how innocent your motives, even very nice people don't want to think they are being monitored.

Let's say the back yard is enclosed. The owner might want to monitor it. The tenant might want to sunbathe. Even if in a bathing suit, who'd want to stretch out in front of a stranger?

I can think of a couple of ways this might be doable. One would be to limit the camera(s) to driveway and front door views. The other would be to offer a $200 per month discount on the rent. Think about it as money versus privacy.

Has any of us known their landlord well enough that they would want him watching them?
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. “Bernie” Shaw
Post 4 made on Tuesday September 12, 2017 at 13:34
lippavisual
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On September 12, 2017 at 13:21, Fred Harding said...
Might want to talk to your attorney about this...

Ditto this. He's opening up a big can of worms!!
Post 5 made on Tuesday September 12, 2017 at 13:54
AnilAppleLink
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We install cameras on many tenant properties. We usually install in public spaces such as the exterior and hallways and all tenants are aware of the cameras. I have had none that objected in the many installs we have done. Most really wanted the extra security and the owners told them they would supply them footage in an incident.

Best to explain to the existing tenants that you will be installing it for safety and all new tenants have it written into the lease that there is 24-hour surveillance in public areas.

We have installed them with, tenant internet, dedicated internet, and local wireless router depending on budget.
In the cases of us using the tenant internet they had good relations with the tenant and worked out some type of deal. Obviously good relations can turn bad but that between the owner and the tenant to work out, nothing to do with you as the installer. Just explain to them that if they decides to change over in the future it will be an additional charge. There were a few were we went back and changed to another tenant, dedicated or a local router. But this was a while after mostly because the tenant had moved.

At a few other locations the owner had a property manger that lived on site and used their internet. If that is not the case, dedicated internet is the most expensive option if he wants to see and retrieve information from home/away and the local router option is a good cheap alternative to being able to sit in a car and review footage.
We usually install the systems in a lock box or locked closet where they can run us a dedicated circuit from the house meter.
--
Thanks,
Anil A. Apple Communication LLC. www.apple-link.com Pro-AV - Pro Lighting - Networking - Security Cameras - Home Theater For all your low voltage cabling needs
Post 6 made on Tuesday September 12, 2017 at 14:02
Mac Burks (39)
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Many rental properties have cameras in public and common areas. Public meaning anything outside and common meaning garages, laundry facility, gyms, clubhouses etc. Even pools.

Why would you need to contact a lawyer? Is it because this client wants to be able to remotely view the property vs viewing it locally?

Obviously this landlord has to have his own power and internet. There isnt any other way to control whether its on/working or not. Landlord cant force people to power/connect his devices.

Last edited by Mac Burks (39) on September 12, 2017 14:18.
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Post 7 made on Tuesday September 12, 2017 at 14:52
Fred Harding
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Mac, different laws state to state. Depends on where the cameras are pointed, perhaps, and a lawyer could say this is allowed, and this isn't.

My feeling is, I'd rather have a lawyers opinion on a privacy issue than an audio video installation chat room, at least if I'm being sued.
On the West Coast of Wisconsin
Post 8 made on Tuesday September 12, 2017 at 17:32
highfigh
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As long as it's in a place where there's no expectation of privacy, it's usually allowed. This is for the property owner to monitor their building which, at face value, isn't really different from monitoring a warehouse, except for people doing things in the back yard that might get out of hand, in a way. If the property has multi-story buildings around it, I think the privacy issue is probably moot. As long as the cameras are set in a way that viewing through windows isn't possible (and some, like Digital Watchdog have a privacy feature), it should be a good thing.
My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."
OP | Post 9 made on Wednesday September 13, 2017 at 00:50
PSS
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On September 12, 2017 at 13:21, Fred Harding said...
Might want to talk to your attorney about this...

The property owner is a partner in a pretty decent sized firm himself, so I think he probably knows what's legal and what's not.
The cameras are just gonna gonna look at common areas, etc.
I'll see what he feels like doing for viewing, etc.


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