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Topic:
Nail plate make sheetrock bulge?
This thread has 36 replies. Displaying posts 16 through 30.
Post 16 made on Wednesday August 24, 2011 at 00:33
FreddyFreeloader
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Real carpenters/ contractors are happy to mortise the nail guards into the studs.
Post 17 made on Wednesday August 24, 2011 at 00:34
FreddyFreeloader
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...
Post 18 made on Wednesday August 24, 2011 at 00:42
mariomp
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So you have this bundle in 2x3" stud?
How big is the bundle?
Where are you going to move this within the stud and still be NEC compliant?
Anything less than 1-1/4" from face of stud needs a nail plate, that's in NEC.
Post 19 made on Wednesday August 24, 2011 at 00:47
brandenpro
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On August 23, 2011 at 23:32, Ernie Gilman said...
Nail plates, snail plates. I once had left a mud ring in a wall,

Only once? This has happened to us many times.
Post 20 made on Wednesday August 24, 2011 at 10:47
BisyB
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On August 23, 2011 at 22:48, Audiophiliac said...
I am picturing a metal grommet that goes around the bundled wires where it passes through the framing that would act as a protector against nails.

Audiophiliac hit exactly on what we've had to do on walls where a smooth, flat finish was involved, protect the wires on the inside of the stud. We did that because moving the wires was going to be a pain.

However, if it's a flip house, just tell him to 'hire a pro' drywall company... might be a lot to ask though, haven't seen one of those in years.
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Post 21 made on Wednesday August 24, 2011 at 11:21
Trunk-Slammer -Supreme
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On August 23, 2011 at 21:33, 2nd rick said...
Nail plates are code here, they aren't code where you are?

There it is!


Although there's not always a code requirement for low voltage, there most always is for electrical and plumbing.

So what's the electrician and plumber going to do, run outside the wall?


GC is an idiot.... If the wiring is run in the wall, it's going to require a nail guard...
Post 22 made on Wednesday August 24, 2011 at 13:09
Mr. Stanley
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On August 23, 2011 at 19:14, goldenzrule said...
Nah, its not gonna be a problem to move. I just never had an issue and was wondering if others had issues before. The bundle is drilled across about waist high in the middle of the room, not in the corner. It's easier to just go move it then argue with the guy.

Depends on how Anal Retentive the builder is. I've had to flush-in nail plates and rough in speaker bracket wings before, because the drywall quality was supposed to be a Level 5 - level of quality.

Kind of a pain, but you gotta do what you gotta do. I'd knotch-out where the nail plate is going.

Last edited by Mr. Stanley on August 24, 2011 18:28.
"If it keeps up, man will atrophy all his limbs but the push-button finger."
Frank Lloyd Wright
Post 23 made on Wednesday August 24, 2011 at 14:42
rbhfan
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On August 23, 2011 at 22:00, Ranger Home said...
Never heard of 2x3 studs in anything but a trailer. might be easier to chisel out the depth of the nail plate. Could save you in the future from someone putting something too long in the stud and hitting your wires. Course, not sure how many studs need plates.

They don't have Ryan Homes in your area? those jokers use 2x3 anything interior that isn't load bearing. Luckily they have their own internal tech drop and CI crew so the occasional retro is all I run into, but I shiver every time I have to hang a display from anything they built.
One thing I have learned in this industry. It is easier to pull a wire than it is to push one.
Post 24 made on Wednesday August 24, 2011 at 14:49
39 Cent Stamp
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I personally haven't seen a single home that was built well enough to even jokingly suggest that the nail plates be removed or inset. Please indulge us with some photos of this "level 4 or 5 or whatever" framing. I could use a good laugh.
Post 25 made on Wednesday August 24, 2011 at 16:23
tweeterguy
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Level 4/5 does not relate to framing. It relates to the way the wallboard/drywall/gypsum is "finished"...involves taping all joints and more skim coats of compound, no trowel marks, etc in level 4. Level 5 goes a bit further in that the entire wall is skim coated. And yes, irregularities will show through on a level 4/5 since they are not textured or very minimally if texture is desired on a level 4. Are they doing this in a home framed with 2x3 (only 2.5" width studs!)? Doubtful.
Post 26 made on Wednesday August 24, 2011 at 18:31
Mr. Stanley
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39 we've done a number of projects (including our showroom) with level 5 drywall standards. They literally skim-coat the whole wall. Takes a GOOD drywaller to pull it off - and it is $$$$$ and it takes a lot of work to pull off.
"If it keeps up, man will atrophy all his limbs but the push-button finger."
Frank Lloyd Wright
Post 27 made on Wednesday August 24, 2011 at 20:12
TRCGroup
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On August 24, 2011 at 11:21, Trunk-Slammer -Supreme said...
Although there's not always a code requirement for low voltage, there most always is for electrical and plumbing.

So what's the electrician and plumber going to do, run outside the wall?

In Texas it's not required for the electrical, even though many house and apartment fires are caused by a screw through the electricians wire at the studs.

When I had my first preside to do here in Houston, my first stop was Greybar to get nail plates and some other goodies that I knew my normal disty's wouldn't have. The looks on their faces was priceless. They had no clue what I was talking about. After about 45 minutes of looking through books and making phone calls, the found some, at another branch. Times like that make me miss Florida.
"You can't fix stupid."
Post 28 made on Wednesday August 24, 2011 at 21:32
39 Cent Stamp
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On August 24, 2011 at 18:31, Mr. Stanley said...
39 we've done a number of projects (including our showroom) with level 5 drywall standards. They literally skim-coat the whole wall. Takes a GOOD drywaller to pull it off - and it is $$$$$ and it takes a lot of work to pull off.

On August 24, 2011 at 16:23, tweeterguy said...
Level 4/5 does not relate to framing. It relates to the way the wallboard/drywall/gypsum is "finished"...involves taping all joints and more skim coats of compound, no trowel marks, etc in level 4. Level 5 goes a bit further in that the entire wall is skim coated. And yes, irregularities will show through on a level 4/5 since they are not textured or very minimally if texture is desired on a level 4. Are they doing this in a home framed with 2x3 (only 2.5" width studs!)? Doubtful.

I guess i just cant understand how a 1/16 of an inch nail plate under a 4X8 sheet of rock makes any difference with a sheetrock project that will have a finished skim coat on top of it? I haven't experienced a bundle of 2X4's that were all perfectly straight either. Do they have someone there with a laser and a sander making sure they are all perfectly level & plumb?

We are not the only industry selling snake oil. The only way i will ever believe this is if i bury a nail plate under a sheet of drywall and have one of the "experts" locate it. A blind plate test :).
Post 29 made on Thursday August 25, 2011 at 00:05
Innovative A/V
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Get out ur chisel ....notch the stud....set your plate flush.....done....easier than moving and easier than trying to mod drywall
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Post 30 made on Thursday August 25, 2011 at 08:06
Bubby
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On August 24, 2011 at 21:32, 39 Cent Stamp said...
I haven't experienced a bundle of 2X4's that were all perfectly straight either. Do they have someone there with a laser and a sander making sure they are all perfectly level & plumb?

Two words: Engineered Lumber.
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