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Topic:
Changing continuous 12V trigger to pulsed on/off trigger for Proceed Amp 2, 3
This thread has 39 replies. Displaying posts 31 through 40.
Post 31 made on Thursday June 4, 2009 at 15:12
1911Guy
Long Time Member
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September 2008
47
On May 28, 2009 at 21:13, Ernie Bornn-Gilman said...
You say the Anthem has a pulsed on-off signal. You say "a," so it's one signal. You say on-off, so it's a toggle. One pulse to turn on, same pulse over same wire to turn off.

And yes, the Xantech would have to receive 12 volts as a turn-on signal, then have no voltage, then twelve volts as a turn-off signal, perhaps running the signal throught a CC12 relay.


Look at page 4 of the manual (figure 6)for the Xantech. It does exactly what you need to control Proceed or a Mark Levinson Amp with a more traditional 12v on for amps on and 0v for amps off.
"...and that's the way it is" Larry Potterfield
Post 32 made on Thursday June 4, 2009 at 15:35
Ernie Bornn-Gilman
Yes, That Ernie!
Joined:
Posts:
December 2001
29,926
On June 4, 2009 at 12:20, Gizmologist09 said...
I am done with this as well as you do not understand the concept or definition of "pulse", "discriminator", "series", "flip/flops",or anything having to do with data streams and how they are generated or decoded or the final output configuration of the microprocessor to energize any given circuit or device.

I do indeed understand some, not all, of these things. I have disagreed with you several times when you consider a series of pulses to be a pulse. You have not responded to that, but gone on to something else.
You really should look past the most basic operation of the remotes you use to learn HOW they function before arguing with someone who designs control circuitry.

I tried to forestall this long series of quibbles. I said that you and I must be talking about different things and I asked you to explain the differences, but you just repeated yourself.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. “Bernie” Shaw
Post 33 made on Thursday June 4, 2009 at 17:33
John Pechulis
Loyal Member
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July 2001
7,127
And to sum it all up: I would never trade reliability for efficiency OR for a wiz-bang gimmick! Efficiency is no good to me if unreliable and wiz-bang gimmicks only end up being trouble in the end.

JP
Post 34 made on Thursday July 16, 2009 at 00:11
internetmin
Lurking Member
Joined:
Posts:
July 2009
1
I had this exact same frustration/question when I got my Proceed amplifiers. I had them connected to my Anthem AVM20 and sure enough, the Proceed amplifiers wanted a pulse on and off and the Anthem like all newer processors only did a constant 12v current.

The Xantech 599 does the trick. I documented the steps and how to connect here:
http://pooraudiophile.blogspot.com

It works flawlessly and highly recommend the Xantech!
Post 35 made on Saturday September 25, 2021 at 19:22
smichalove
New Member
Joined:
Posts:
September 2021
1
I have solved this using a Raspberry Pi 4 b and a 12 V relay:
[Link: github.com]

Its my first Raspberry project so others may know a more graceful way to do this:

# Plulse conversion from constant 12V input
#This assumes your Mark Levinson APM is on Standby as start state
#Your input to the Mark Levinson Should connect to GPIO21 for + and a GRND
#The control Signal from constant high or low should connect to a 12 V relay
#the switch signals from the relay to toggle on/off should be connected to GPIO twenty six and GRND
import signal
import sys
from time import sleep
import RPi.GPIO as GPIO
from gpiozero import LED, Button
from gpiozero.tools import booleanized, all_values
GPIO.setmode(GPIO.BCM)
AMP=21 #Control Signal to amp
GPIO.setup(AMP, GPIO.OUT)
Button.was_held = False

def held(btn): #when siglnal is high and stays high
btn.was_held = True
print("button was held ")
GPIO.output(AMP, 1)
sleep(.3)
GPIO.output(AMP, 0)

def released(btn): #when signal is low and stays low
if not btn.was_held:
print("Release1")
pressed()
else:
print("Release2")
GPIO.output(AMP, 1)
sleep(.3)
GPIO.output(AMP, 0)

btn.was_held = False

def pressed():
print("button was pressed not held")


btn = Button(26,bounce_time = .001) # relay is on pin GPIO2 and GRND

if __name__ == '__main__':

while True:
btn.when_held = held
btn.when_released = released
sleep(1)

GPIO.cleanup()
Post 36 made on Monday September 27, 2021 at 12:39
Redbiker98
Regular Member
Joined:
Posts:
November 2020
109
It only took 12 years for the solution.
Post 37 made on Monday September 27, 2021 at 13:47
Ernie Gilman
Yes, That Ernie!
Joined:
Posts:
December 2001
29,926
This "solution" is no solution. It uses a more complicated product. It needs programming, which none of the other solutions require. This programming must be learned or at least followed step by step. I believe it occupies more real estate when seen two-dimensionally and more volume when seen three-dimensionally.

It is SEEN as the solution because we're used to picking an actual computer off of a shelf and programming it to do a tiny thing.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. “Bernie” Shaw
Post 38 made on Monday September 27, 2021 at 17:42
buzz
Super Member
Joined:
Posts:
May 2003
3,920
PI is a tiny computer. It’s a tool. We each have a collection of tools that we regularly use. Someone who has access to a machine shop will use a lot less duct tape than someone who uses simple hand tools. Electricians have a bag of wire nuts, I have a soldering iron and crimps. We might have one dull saw. A cabinet maker will have a collection of sharp saws. He can fit a countertop in minutes, we’ll probably struggle for hours.

In one case I threw together a single board computer controller for a project that could probably have been done with time delay relays, latching relays, NE555’s, flip flops, and a little logic. Since I had the computer, EPROM burner, and a programming system on hand, similar to the machine shop guy, I had the controller ready for deployment in a few hours. This was much less elapsed time than would have been required to design, scrounge parts that were not on hand, build, and test a Rube Goldberg sort of controller. And, I needed the controller the next day. Multiple inputs and outputs, timers, logic, and management for power up and power failure were easy in the program. This was way before the PI existed.
Post 39 made on Monday September 27, 2021 at 21:58
Ernie Gilman
Yes, That Ernie!
Joined:
Posts:
December 2001
29,926
No excuses, buzz. No excuses.
A good answer is easier with a clear question giving the make and model of everything.
"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -- G. “Bernie” Shaw
Post 40 made on Tuesday September 28, 2021 at 06:11
buzz
Super Member
Joined:
Posts:
May 2003
3,920
And, a 3D printer person would approach a problem very differently from a traditional machine shop guy or our duct tape guy.

It's a new world. Sure, lots of clever things can be done with an R/C network and some relay logic, but a very cheap computer board could watch the CEC bus, accept WiFi commands, and perform much more complex logic.

It's just a different set of tools and a different set of skills. The 3D printer person would probably feel helpless in a machine shop and the reverse is true too.

Last edited by buzz on September 28, 2021 17:54.
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