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Topic:
Prontoscript, should I go there?
This thread has 11 replies. Displaying all posts.
Post 1 made on Monday December 14, 2009 at 14:19
crabman
Long Time Member
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My installer called and my remote is backordered. I have finished my configuration and was considering trying a few simple (I think?) scripts for the rotory while I wait. I have no programming knowledge or background and would have to seek the information and figure things out. About the only thing I would have going for me is I have a knack for picking things up easily. How much time would you estimate I would have to invest to get a working knowledge sufficient to fiddle with this?
Post 2 made on Monday December 14, 2009 at 17:03
b00bie
Founding Member
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July 2001
396
Hi

Why not D/L the Developer Guide From the Pronto Pro files section and take a look through it, that should you give you some kind of idea what you will need to know to get started, and then practice, practice, practice.

Tom
OP | Post 3 made on Monday December 14, 2009 at 18:22
crabman
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On December 14, 2009 at 17:03, b00bie said...
Hi

Why not D/L the Developer Guide From the Pronto Pro files section and take a look through it, that should you give you some kind of idea what you will need to know to get started, and then practice, practice, practice.

Tom

Mostly because I'm that type that once I dig into something there will be no quit no matter how much torture is involved. Knowing this I was trying to get an idea of the time investment required before I jump off the cliff...
Post 4 made on Monday December 14, 2009 at 22:29
joelz
Long Time Member
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38
to just get the rotory wheel working, my "guess" is a minimum of a few hours with use of the developer doc, PEP2 docs and the search engine here.

However, if you do the rotory wheel you might as well configure your whole system while saving money and making good use of your spare time.

My other "guess" is once you dig in, you will get bit hard by the Pronto remote bug and will be heads down in customizing your remote, buying extenders, drinking lots of coffee, up late at night, dreaming about JavaScript etc. :)
Post 5 made on Monday December 14, 2009 at 22:48
Peter Dewildt
Loyal Member
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6,307
The next version of PEP has support for programming the rotary wheel without using ProntoScript. It will be released very soon.
Peter
Pronto 1000 (retired), Pronto TSU7000, RFX6000 (retired)
Pronto 2xTSU9600, RFX9400
Post 6 made on Tuesday December 15, 2009 at 00:21
Lyndel McGee
RC Moderator
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12,609
But if you'd like to do something like this, there's an example in the Files section provided by (I hope I get the name right) Herb Crane.

Lyndel
Lyndel McGee
Philips Pronto Addict/Beta Tester
Post 7 made on Wednesday December 16, 2009 at 10:24
Rusty Fobe
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47
A wise man once said that effort and time to build knowledge and skill is expressed in powers of 10 times 2.

2 hours please
20 hours tease
200 hours ease ?
2000 hours appease
20000 hours release ?

When against your nature:

2 hours unease
20 hours cease ?
200 hours displease
2000 hours disease
20000 hours decease ?

Not to scare you, but it's not different with any computer language in my opinion. Let alone the effort one has to put into writing logically. Likewise knowledge of language is insufficient to write an essay...

200 hours looks a fair figure to get things going, amateur level I guess, while 2000 is closer to semi-professional. Some people are faster than others of course.

Rusty
Post 8 made on Wednesday December 16, 2009 at 12:23
Lyndel McGee
RC Moderator
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It helps if you are a programmer/engineer simply because engineers usually treat language like a tool. Just as a carpenter knows how to build a house, read blueprints, etc...; he/she will choose the right tool to get the job done most efficiently. A software engineer well-versed with algorithms and communication models (synchronous vs asynchronous) looks at the features of the language and determines how best to write an algorithm.

Case in point, I coded a quickie socket communication algorithm in about 2 hours the other night for full asynchronous communication and event reporting.
My first time through this 2 years ago, I spent 10X that amount of time learning the ProntoScript Object model and figuring out how to apply my algorithm to the language/object model.

So, as Rusty points out, there is a learning curve. However, if you do this enough, methodologies will be ingrained into your psyche and therefore you will spend much less time doing same thing next time.
Lyndel McGee
Philips Pronto Addict/Beta Tester
Post 9 made on Wednesday December 16, 2009 at 12:44
Herb Crane
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101
Don't be intimidated by ProntoScript!

I am an amature but wanted to do two simple things; use the rotary wheel and have the remote take action based on a variable. ProntoScript was the only way so I forced myself through it.

I read the developers guide and went to the bookstore. I found the developers guide lacking in that it does assume JavaScript knowledge. I could have used some more examples. I shouldn't complain because it isn't written for the amature. I didn't want to spend the money on the reference books because I didn't plan on going into depth.

Anyone that has made the TSU's work can do it following the examples in the files section. I made these so that others would be saved some of the frustration I went through. But follow very closely as there are many pitfalls for the beginner.

Herb
OP | Post 10 made on Wednesday December 16, 2009 at 18:18
crabman
Long Time Member
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December 2009
20
Ok, thanks guys. I have looked over the developers guide and am understanding a few things but stymied by most. In many cases I do not understand the concept, let alone the execution. Going to see if I can find some javascript for dummies type of stuff online. I think I may dig in if I start feeling like I'm getting a handle on the general concepts. A well rounded education should include some coding right? lol.
Post 11 made on Wednesday December 16, 2009 at 19:10
Rusty Fobe
Long Time Member
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December 2008
47
Good approach! The learn by example as indicated by Herb will speed up your knowledge even more. There is a lot of example code hidden in threads. Success.
I have a friend (engineer) who installed code bought from Barry... He (my friend) does not have Javascript knowledge. So nothing is lost if you should decide otherwise.
Rusty
Post 12 made on Thursday September 3, 2020 at 12:51
Lyndel McGee
RC Moderator
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Posts:
August 2001
12,609
I removed a spam post from this thread. Nothing to see here. :-)
Lyndel McGee
Philips Pronto Addict/Beta Tester


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