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Topic:
Manually Converting Pronto HEX to RAW
This thread has 2 replies. Displaying all posts.
Post 1 made on Tuesday July 8, 2014 at 11:52
jasonf
Junior Member
Joined:
Posts:
July 2014
1
Hey guys,

First post here. Not even sure if this is an appropriate forum for this post, I'm finding it a bit difficult to find resources on IR-related topics.

I'm really just getting my feet wet when it comes to IR protocols and IR codes in general, so my knowledge and understanding may be a bit shaky here.

So I have some Pronto HEX CCF IR codes and am trying to create a tool to convert them to RAW IR pulses. To do this I'm trying to understand the process manually.

What I have so far is the result of lots of searching, playing around with tools and piecing things together.

So, take for example the code string:
0000 006E 0011 0006 0012 0052 0014 0051 0014
0051 0014 0051 0013 0052 0013 0052 0024 0051
0014 0031 0014 0052 0023 0052 0034 0051 0014
0051 0014 0052 0013 0052 0013 0052 0014 0051
0014 0632 0154 0051 0014 0CE5 0154 0051 0014
0CE5 0154 0051 0014 0CE5

I know the first set, "0000", indicates it's raw oscillated code.
I believe the second set "006E" indicates the frequency for the code and can be converted to khz via:
006E to decimal = 110
1000000 / (110 * .241246) = 37683.14Khz
I know that the third and fourth sets of codes have to do with the sequence lengths.

I know the rest of the sets can be converted to pulses in microseconds with the following, using "0012" as an example
0012 to decimal = 18
1000000 * 18 / 37683 = 478 microseconds

So, applying the above to the full code I end up with:
478,2176,531,2150,531,2150,531,2150,504,2176,504,2176, 955,2150,531,1300,531,2176,929,2176,1380,2150,531,2150, 531,2176,504,2176,504,2176,531,2150,531,42088,9023,2150, 531,87599,9023,2150,531,87599,9023,2150,531,87599

When I test this out with an IR blaster I don't see the device I am trying to control respond. However if I prepend the header for NEC protocol 9000,4500, I get a response from my device.

My questions are - Could someone tell me if I am on the right track here? How would I discern from the HEX code that I needed to use the 9000 on 4500 off header? Any input/advice would be really appreciated, as I've said I'm just getting my feet wet here. Thanks much!
Post 2 made on Tuesday July 8, 2014 at 14:46
Barf
Long Time Member
Joined:
Posts:
August 2013
183
Hi Jason,

basically, you are on the right track. Please check out my web site, in particular the interactive program IrScrutinizer [Link: harctoolbox.org], which allows you to do all the involved computations interactively, and IrpMaster [Link: harctoolbox.org] which can be used either from the command line or as API. The syntax of the CCF notations is explained in many places, also here: [Link: harctoolbox.org] .
Post 3 made on Tuesday July 8, 2014 at 21:17
SysIntegration
Advanced Member
Joined:
Posts:
December 2013
895
On July 8, 2014 at 11:52, jasonf said...
Hey guys,

First post here. Not even sure if this is an appropriate forum for this post, I'm finding it a bit difficult to find resources on IR-related topics.

I'm really just getting my feet wet when it comes to IR protocols and IR codes in general, so my knowledge and understanding may be a bit shaky here.

So I have some Pronto HEX CCF IR codes and am trying to create a tool to convert them to RAW IR pulses. To do this I'm trying to understand the process manually.

What I have so far is the result of lots of searching, playing around with tools and piecing things together.

So, take for example the code string:
0000 006E 0011 0006 0012 0052 0014 0051 0014
0051 0014 0051 0013 0052 0013 0052 0024 0051
0014 0031 0014 0052 0023 0052 0034 0051 0014
0051 0014 0052 0013 0052 0013 0052 0014 0051
0014 0632 0154 0051 0014 0CE5 0154 0051 0014
0CE5 0154 0051 0014 0CE5

I know the first set, "0000", indicates it's raw oscillated code.
I believe the second set "006E" indicates the frequency for the code and can be converted to khz via:
006E to decimal = 110
1000000 / (110 * .241246) = 37683.14Khz
I know that the third and fourth sets of codes have to do with the sequence lengths.

I know the rest of the sets can be converted to pulses in microseconds with the following, using "0012" as an example
0012 to decimal = 18
1000000 * 18 / 37683 = 478 microseconds

So, applying the above to the full code I end up with:

When I test this out with an IR blaster I don't see the device I am trying to control respond. However if I prepend the header for NEC protocol 9000,4500, I get a response from my device.

My questions are - Could someone tell me if I am on the right track here? How would I discern from the HEX code that I needed to use the 9000 on 4500 off header? Any input/advice would be really appreciated, as I've said I'm just getting my feet wet here. Thanks much!

I found this document to be quite helpful. Plus Barry wrote it, so it must be good.

[Link: remotecentral.com]

It is also floating around in a .doc format in the downloads section, as the HTML format and having to jump between pages creates a lot of cognitive drift opportunities.

Also. IRS is awesome. jump into it head first.
0101001101111001011100110100100101101110011101000110010101100111011100100110000101110100011010010110111101101110


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