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Topic:
MX-3000 jump
This thread has 5 replies. Displaying all posts.
Post 1 made on Monday August 13, 2012 at 14:15
cbond
Long Time Member
Joined:
Posts:
December 2006
166
Just curious what happens if you put two jumps
in the same button macro. Also, does anyone
know if it makes sense to alias to a button with
a single delay as its macro? Does putting a
delay use more code than an alias? I'm trying
to streamline a large rcc file.
I love the sound of bagpipes when I'm mourning.
Post 2 made on Monday August 13, 2012 at 14:27
goldenzrule
Loyal Member
Joined:
Posts:
July 2007
8,260
The macro will take you to the last jump entered into the macro. If you have two jumps with a long enough delay in between you will notice it go to first one page jump, and then the second. If there is no delay or a short one, you probably will not even see the first page jump. Not sure what your goal is with the second question.
Post 3 made on Monday August 13, 2012 at 15:10
AVGregg
Long Time Member
Joined:
Posts:
June 2006
304
I usually do 2 jumps on an activity macro. 1st jump goes to a please wait page, then the macro steps, then the jump to the device page.
OP | Post 4 made on Monday August 13, 2012 at 15:28
cbond
Long Time Member
Joined:
Posts:
December 2006
166
The reason for the question about placing a delay
vs. aliasing to a delay was raised because I don't
know what code is generated by putting a delay
in the delay line. I know an alias takes less space
than putting an IR code in its column. I'm trying
to trim code, but I don't know what code actually
goes in the rcc file for each element of a macro.
I love the sound of bagpipes when I'm mourning.
Post 5 made on Tuesday August 14, 2012 at 07:40
Total Control Remotes
Super Member
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Posts:
July 2006
2,987
It won't make much difference if you alias a delay or use it as it's own command. however, with IR codes, it's different.

Placing an IR code in the remote takes up memory. If you need to execute that command in 4 different places it makes little to no sense in putting 4 different IR cdoes in the remote, therefore taking up space and having to go through the trouble of looking it up. In addition, you will have to worry how that device gets routed through a base unit if using one.

Rather, URC employs "aliases" or simply allows you to link to a code from anywhere. So if you are in the TV device that is set to use PORT 1 on the base station and the CABLE is set to use PORT 2, by putting an IR code in the TV device that sets the "ASPECT RATIO" of the cable will not execute properly. It's using PORT 1. However, by linking to the ASPECT command ON the cable device you are not only saving memory, reducing the work involved, but you are allowing the device that is using port 1 the ability to contain commands for other devices in the remote that are using other ports.

Hope this makes sense.

Total Control Remotes
OP | Post 6 made on Tuesday August 14, 2012 at 11:13
cbond
Long Time Member
Joined:
Posts:
December 2006
166
Makes sense. Thanks for the explanation.
I love the sound of bagpipes when I'm mourning.


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